Smart Car of America Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi Folks,

I have had my Pure for almost five years. been a member here for the same amount of time. You people post 99% of the answers I am looking for. But,

I went to change the oil in the LEM today, pulled the oil plug and the treads came with it. A few colorful four letter words later. I found that there was enough treads left to tighten down the plug. The thing is who has had the oil pan replaced or has done it themselves and how much for the parts, and where to get the pan from.

Any help is appreciated.

Marc
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,218 Posts
This exact same thing happened to my Pure last summer. I ended up using a plug from a Dodge diesel which is about 1/4 inch longer to seal the drain hole. Last 2 oil changes I have used an oil extractor. It looks like an old style gas can with a pump handle so you can draw a vacuum and 'suck' the oil up through the dipstick tube. It takes about the same amount of time to drain the oil, and you still have to change the filter underneath, but it is a heck of a lot easier than fighting with that drain plug. Make sure the oil is warmed up good so it flows through the small plastic tube.

Liquivac Topsider Oil Changer | Oil Extractors| Northern Tool + Equipment

I have heard changing the oil pan out is not an easy job. The Time Sert is the best way to repair the plug hole but they are not cheap either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
271 Posts
Helicoils are not suggested for oil drain plugs, they can leak oil.
I understand that to be the case with plugs thst have tapered threads. Would that be the case with plugs that rely on a washer or gasket for the seal?
Spark plug threads are often repaired with helicoils and they are under a lot more pressure, but they do have washers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,971 Posts
...long before there were Time Sert or Keen Sert there was Helicoil saving the world from pulled out thread...
..when done right Helicoil gets the job done no matter the environment they live in...

Jetfuel...BTDTFT...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,218 Posts
I just recall when the spark plug threads blew out on the Ford, they said that the TimeSerts were a better choice as they would seal from oil leaks and hold better than the Helicoils. I have used a bunch of Helicoils back when I had Corvairs which had aluminum blocks and the oil pans would tear out the threads and leak oil.

TIME-SERT® inserts have no prongs or tangs to break off or deal with down in the hole, which can be a problem in deep holes.

TIME-SERT® inserts are self-locking having an actual locking feature which will prevent them from coming out when a bolt is removed. On installation the bottom few internal threads of the insert are cold rolled to expand into the mating external threads of the base material locking the insert in place.

TIME-SERT® inserts have a flange, which will give them a positive placement on installation for “accurate specific depths”. This ensures that the insert does not wind down into the threaded hole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,297 Posts
The thing about using a helicoil insert for a drain plug repair... First, you must make absolutely sure the insert is slightly below the surface so that the copper gasket will compress against the aluminum boss and not the insert, if not a guaranteed leak...
Second, by installing a helicoil you have cut down the surface area for the copper gasket to seal against...In some cases a larger outside diameter gasket and even a larger flanged head drain plug may be necessary..
At any rate, a helicoil can be used if you pay attention to detail...:wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,971 Posts
..to follow up..
..the Time Sert built in flange for positive placement and installation requires a steady hand....and I mean steady...to obtain the specific depth....

Jetfuel....shaking already...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,218 Posts
Not an easy task hanging under a car to do. and then you need to pay attention where those metal shavings end up...
If I had it to do over again, I'd go with one of those rapid oil drain valves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,971 Posts
...using beeswax...or even soap from a bar will help pull / hold the shavings from the drilling process...
...the size of the person hanging under the car matters too...

Jetfuel...luvU2
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
300 Posts
I'd find a good shop to do this. My friend owns a classic car shop and is darn good at these repairs. I would call around. Most towns have a good classic shop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Not an easy task hanging under a car to do. and then you need to pay attention where those metal shavings end up...
If I had it to do over again, I'd go with one of those rapid oil drain valves.
I'm a true believer in them. I don't trust anyone to change my oil...it's just too easy for some minimum wage earner who doesn't have an interest in your vehicle to screw up. And the pain of dealing with it later. My wife took her Accord in once (I was deployed, that's my escuse), and they stripped the threads. Major PITA.
Get a rapid drain. One of the first mods I did on my smart. Quick, clean, and NEVER worry about the threads again. Qwik Drain Oil Valve
Best thing for peace of mind...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Just got off the phone with the dealership. $194 for a new pan, one word-OUCH. I will still think about the different ways to fix this. $194 plus labor is a little out of my reach right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
The labor will be a lot more than $194, and I mean a whole lot more. Having resealed the oil pan on my 2009 I can understand why the part costs so much. Everything mounts to the oil pan so it's very substantial. That also drives up the labor because so much must be unbolted from the pan to pull it.

Good luck!


Sent from AutoGuide.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,454 Posts
This exact same thing happened to my Pure last summer. I ended up using a plug from a Dodge diesel which is about 1/4 inch longer to seal the drain hole. Last 2 oil changes I have used an oil extractor. It looks like an old style gas can with a pump handle so you can draw a vacuum and 'suck' the oil up through the dipstick tube. It takes about the same amount of time to drain the oil, and you still have to change the filter underneath, but it is a heck of a lot easier than fighting with that drain plug. Make sure the oil is warmed up good so it flows through the small plastic tube.

Liquivac Topsider Oil Changer | Oil Extractors| Northern Tool + Equipment

I have heard changing the oil pan out is not an easy job. The Time Sert is the best way to repair the plug hole but they are not cheap either.
I use the Topsider... Change oil every 5000 miles... The Smart is 2009, and I had it from New, and it is now 4 1/2 years of ownership... The pan plug was put in at the Factory, and HAS NEVER BEEN REMOVED...!!! Its been Sucked Dry 7 times with the Topsider...<:)) Its neat, clean, and ends up right in the holding can... Guess what... "Drum Roll"... NO STRIPPED DRAIN PLUG...<:))
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top