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I am hoping for lighter, although it is a real challenge to put more safety equipment and more bells and whistles into the vehicle and keep the weight down. It has been a rare case lately for a successor vehicle to be lighter than its predecessor. I predict the weight will stay close to the same.

The 105 hp engine is a turbo gas engine. Regular gasoline in an engine like that is unlikely.

I suspect that fuel consumption will be improved, but probably only by a slim margin.
 

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Turbo and regular gas are not incomparable. This has been done by numerous manufacturers. The key is what Daimler will specify for the engine. Octane of 91 is specified for my 1990 2.6L engine that doesn't really have compression all that high. Daimler has been doing so with its engines for a long time. Be interesting to see if Renault specifies the same octane. At least my 1977 230 gasser with 84 hp was rated for regular gas. As for weight, I think it best for it to be kept about the same or very slightly heavier.
 

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Regular gas?
Don't think you will be using regular gas in these modern small displacement engines?

Some TWINGO stuff (Euro speak, will no doubt be tweaked for U.S.?) to include March 4, 2014 Renault Press Release . . .

Power is provided by either a naturally aspirated, 70-horsepower, 1.0-liter three-cylinder engine or a turbocharged 900cc triple with 90 horsepower and 100 lb-ft, the latter of which sounds like quite a lot of fun in a lightweight small car.

The brand new SCe 70, a normally-aspirated derivative of the TCe range. The responsive performance of this 70hp and 91Nm, normally-aspirated 999cc petrol engine makes it ideal for motoring in built-up areas, especially since torque is available from very low engine speeds. Inexpensive to buy and run, this latest-generation powerplant will be available with or without Stop&Start, depending on market.

The Energy TCe 90: dynamic and fun to drive. Not only is this 898cc turbocharged petrol powerplant responsive at low engine speeds but it also delivers refined performance thanks to a power output of 90hp and peak torque of 135Nm. It was redesigned specially for New Twingo and the turbo is equipped with an electric waste gate to provide the optimal balance between performance and fuel consumption. The Energy TCe 90 engine incorporates Stop&Start as standard and complies with Euro 6 emission legislation.


2014 Renault Twingo is a rear-engined cutie - Autoblog

With the Nissan/Renault alliance, we need a third engine choice? Why not stuff the Juke's 1.6 turbo in the engine bay?

 

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I am hoping for lighter, although it is a real challenge to put more safety equipment and more bells and whistles into the vehicle and keep the weight down. It has been a rare case lately for a successor vehicle to be lighter than its predecessor. I predict the weight will stay close to the same.

The 105 hp engine is a turbo gas engine. Regular gasoline in an engine like that is unlikely.

I suspect that fuel consumption will be improved, but probably only by a slim margin.
Indeed. The car is getting wider and is taking on more features than ever. I predict weight gain, though not much.

Mercedes is aiming for fuel economy in the mid to high 50s. As of now, no Diesel engine either (not at all, for any market).

As far as regular in a turbo engine, both GM's and Ford's small turbos run on regular! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Mercedes is aiming for fuel economy in the mid to high 50s.

Yes, about those mileage claims… I'm afraid those figures may be expected Euro test results.

We shall see.

And given that the smart is expected to be positioned upmarket of the Twingo, a bump in horsepower wouldn't be surprising.
 

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I doubt that the US version will have 105 HP, because that's likely to be BRABUS level in Europe. However, if the US version is turbocharged, it will certainly require 91 Octane gas and although official fuel consumption figures can't be anything but a lot better than the Mitsu engine, the real world consumption will be a lot worse for most people, as they often are with turbocharged gas engines. Some hypermilers will get anomalously high MPG figures, which will lead to lots of controversial threads here!! hehe
 

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Discussion Starter #9
?.. the real world consumption will be a lot worse for most people, as they often are with turbocharged gas engines.

My 160-HP Abarth is EPA rated at 28/34. My lifetime mileage, tracking every tank for 21,000 miles, has averaged 32+ MPG in mixed bat-out-of-hell use, and always 38+ on the highway. That's with AC on always. Love my turbo.
 

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I always do considerably better than the official figures too - even with my heavily modified diesel turbo smart - but that is somewhat unusual.
 

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Yes, GM and Ford have arranged for their turbo engines to run on regular gasoline.

BUT ... There is no magic involved here. Gasoline/air mixture + heat and pressure => detonation. If you tune the engine so that it can run on regular gasoline, that means lowering compression and/or retarding ignition timing and/or running overly rich to attempt to preclude detonation, and that adds up to lousy mileage. The Ford Ecoboost engines have been proving to be unremarkable for fuel consumption in real world driving. If you putter around slowly so that the engine never goes on boost (i.e. you emulate the EPA testing cycle ...) then they do pretty well. But get into the boost, where they start having to do something to preclude detonation, and they get thirsty.

Engines of European origin tend to be tuned for higher octane levels since the 95 RON fuel which is commonplace there is approximately equivalent to 91 (RON+MON)/2 North American fuel.

Smaller displacement engines and higher-revving engines tend to be less prone to detonation and don't need as much enrichment (or compression-lowering) to survive, which means there is some hope ... but I betcha that any turbo version of this engine will run better on premium, no matter what the manufacturer says ...
 

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Dual exhaust by BRABUS with diesel catalyst, "65 HP" remap (up from 41 stock). Those are the only engine modifications. The wider than normal tires also would drink more fuel, but despite all this I still exceed the Transport Canada fuel economy ratings.
 

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I would predict that the 453 will be closer to 2000lbs simply because of the new crash and safety standards and the added width.
I have two uncles with ford ecoboost trucks and my dads hemi 8spd Ram consistently beats their trucks in fuel mileage. Towing there isn't even a conversation. Once your into boost the fuel starts flowin.
 
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