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15A 120V circuit can only supply 7.5A at 240V.

Have an electrician wire in a proper 240V plug. If the wiring in your home will not support this, return the ED and get an ICE.
 

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You have your answer in front of you. The capacity of the converter is listed as 100 watts. The capacity of the Charger is 7,200 watts. IF the charger was just the 200 watts, never mind the 7000, the converter would ony have half the power required.
A typical portable room heater is 1500 watts.
Most homes today have an electrical panel that can deliver from 100 to 200 Amps, with two 110 volt legs, which together supply 220 volts a.c. two phase power.
The only way to get more power, faster, is to install a three phase transformer on the pole supplying your house, new power line from pole to house, new electrical panel and a three phase charger which is probably not available. IF it were, all the other changes would be highly expensive to have in place to be able to charge at a faster rate.
 

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Three phase charger (22Kw) is currently available in Europe and works really well.

It can recharge a smart in minutes as opposed to hours (45 min if I recall correctly?)

Problem is it is designed for European 50 cycle power.

There is an effort underway to get it modified to US 60 cycle power and then get it US certified?
 

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If it is designed for 50Hz it will work just fine on 60Hz. The other way does not work out so well.

Getting UL/CSA approval is likely the real hold up because that will cost money.
 

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Problem is it is designed for European 50 cycle power.

There is an effort underway to get it modified to US 60 cycle power and then get it US certified?
The frequency is not the problem. The problem is that the 22kW charger requires 400V 3-phase, which is common in Europe, including in private homes. In the US, 3-phase is only common in industrial settings (at 208 or, even less common, 480V). I'm sure a charger could be built to work on 480V, but nobody is going to want to invest in the development of that for the tiny fraction of us who would be able to use one.
 

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can something like this be used to step up the voltage to charge faster on regular plug with these? Just asking if possible not if i "should do it"
Sure, if you get the 4kW version of it, ground it properly, and plug it into a 120V, 40A circuit:wink:

Oh, and then you still need a level-2 EVSE to connect the transformer to the car.
 

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Sure, if you get the 4kW version of it, ground it properly, and plug it into a 120V, 40A circuit:wink:

Oh, and then you still need a level-2 EVSE to connect the transformer to the car.
Plus you get to watch your electric bill soar... You know what a 40 A circuit will do to your electric bill???:eek:
 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ODOf_xC4XAY

Factory sent this video. The Super Turbo Charger is on the way! Recharges from dead in the same time it takes to fill a gas smart at Exxon. Make sure to have the driveway and sideyard cleaned out so the power company can install the wires to these transformers as soon as it gets there. 300 kilowatts will recharge a 30KWh car battery pack in 6-7 minutes! (with a lotta cooling fans...)
 

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Do the math:

(22KW) x 4 hrs/day x 30 days = 2,640KwH x 12c/Kwh (here) = $316/month plus all your other electric loads you're already paying for. 316 x 12 = $3,792 per year to ride 50-60 miles a day if nothing expensive goes wrong, like a $6000 charge controller board.

Electric car owners ride almost for free!

Too bad we can't buy the DIESEL!
Dammit!
 

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Do the math:

(22KW) x 4 hrs/day x 30 days = 2,640KwH x 12c/Kwh (here) = $316/month plus all your other electric loads you're already paying for. 316 x 12 = $3,792 per year to ride 50-60 miles a day if nothing expensive goes wrong, like a $6000 charge controller board.

Electric car owners ride almost for free!

Too bad we can't buy the DIESEL!
Dammit!
Boy are you poorly informed!

50-60miles a day takes 15kWh, not 88. So that's 450kWh a month in your usage case, or $54.
How much do you pay for gas?
1500 to 1800 miles at 40 mpg and $3/gallon gas (being generous here) is $112 to $135. How often does your ICE engine block fail and how much to replace it?

I know, I shouldn't feed the trolls...
 

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Plus you get to watch your electric bill soar... You know what a 40 A circuit will do to your electric bill???:eek:
The same as a 20 A circuit, namely, would provide the Smart ED charger it's maximum draw of 3.3KW on 220V.

40A is not to be feared. Tesla's can charge at 90A on 220V. I plan on wiring up a 90A breaker when I get my full sized electric car in a few years to replace our existing Mercedes SUV. Electricity is the far cheaper fuel than gas, no matter the Amps used to deliver it to the car charger. I won't be worrying about my electricity bill, I'll be rejoicing in the fact I won't be spending hundreds per month on gas driving to our far-away winter sporting weekends.
 

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The same as a 20 A circuit, namely, would provide the Smart ED charger it's maximum draw of 3.3KW on 220V.

40A is not to be feared. Tesla's can charge at 90A on 220V. I plan on wiring up a 90A breaker when I get my full sized electric car in a few years to replace our existing Mercedes SUV. Electricity is the far cheaper fuel than gas, no matter the Amps used to deliver it to the car charger. I won't be worrying about my electricity bill, I'll be rejoicing in the fact I won't be spending hundreds per month on gas driving to our far-away winter sporting weekends.

Well, they must figure your rate differently, because around here, you not only get charged for what you use. But your actual rate/KWh is based on peak usage. They see that 40A spike, and it means $$$ to the power company. It's not only how much you use, but how fast you use it... They start seeing 40A spikes at night for 4-6 hours, and they will raise your rate because it can bump you up to a higher bracket user.

And when you start pulling down 90A for a Tesla... hold on to your butt, because it's going to hurt... Of course, if you can afford a Tesla, it probably doesn't concern you...
 

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But your actual rate/KWh is based on peak usage. ... It's not only how much you use, but how fast you use it...
Uhm... No? I think you misunderstand "peak usage". Most places that talk about that have "Time Of Usage" billing. The rate is higher per kW when power is at a premium on the grid at large. Generally that's during daylight/business hours, when factories and other large consumers are running.

A common electric meter records the number of kWh you're using, and maybe (in the case of TOU) when you're using it. I've never seen a meter that measures Amperage, and doubt such a thing exists. Even the "smart meters" they have out generally have collective sample times measured in multiple-hour blocks.

You see, Amperage (unlike Watts) will change based on the Voltage you're using. 2A from your iPhone charging brick is not the same as 2A used by your ceiling fan. The iPhone, running at 5V, is drawing 10Watts. The ceiling fan, running at 120V is drawing 240Watts. Despite the fact that they're both using 2A. Electric companies care a little about Voltage and Hertz for tollerance reasons, but they always bill in Watts. The only thing that cares about Amperage is your fuse box, mainly to make sure your wiring doesn't turn into an arc welder if something shorts.

As for the hype about "running heaters 24/7" to equate electric usage for an EV, you're all frankly daft. Most days one doesn't use 100% of their battery in an EV. Even if one does, an electric car is more cost effective to run than an ICE.

With a 17.6kWh battery, a max charge, even at the "average" US cost for electric (12.5¢/kWh) is ~ $2.20 per day. And you'd have to use up the full battery (generally ~58 miles). Even in an ICE getting 58 mpg, unless you're getting gas at $2.20 a gallon, electric is cheaper.

Want more math?

I've tracked every penny of gas going into my 2008 smart since the day I bought it. At just over 90K miles now, I'm averaging 10.5¢ per mile. (~37mpg, ~$3.90/gallon). Then add up the expenses for oil changes, filters, timing belts, spark plugs, and various other misc repairs that are specifically ICE engine related. Tires, wipers, etc, are the same on an EV, so don't include that. Also add the time and inconvenience (or labor) associated with that.

Now consider the costs of operation on my 2013 EV: I get ~2.7 miles/kWh, my end cost (after taxes and all) is a hair under 9.5¢/kWh, giving my EV an operational cost of 3.5¢ per mile. Throw in the low upkeep costs (annual "battery check"), and the possibility of a battery change 8+ years in, and it's all pretty much a wash.

And yes, I say 8+ years mainly because most hybrids and EVs on the market that long have not required battery changes. Remember how the Prius was going to need a "new $10K battery pack after 5 years"? More than 95% haven't needed one 14 years later, and the ones that do? Not that bad, $3K installed by a dealer (and that was in 2012).
 
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