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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone

I am looking for a Aluminum Oil Pan for my 2008 Smart I striped the drain plug :((
Anyone have one ?? Let me know

Thanks
Biggs
 

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I assume you mean you stripped the drain plug hole threads. same thing happened to my 2009 when I was at a Rapid Oil Change place. I recalled there was a plug that was a bit longer than the stock one listed on here ...

I found that a Dodge truck replacement drain plug, part number 652886 (M22-1.5) in about an inch long (all of the measurements that I've given are approximate, don't write back and criticise me with the exact measurements).

And I called the auto parts store down the street, who had one in stock. It went right in and sealed just fine. I have not taken it out since. I now use an oil extractor and remove the oil from the dipstick tube. It works great and is much cleaner, and just as fast. You do lose the screen at the end of the plug.
 

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my research indicated that the pan replacement was expensive, and even then it doesn't stop it from happening again. I am quite surprised that it was designed this way.
 

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Hello everyone

I am looking for a Aluminum Oil Pan for my 2008 Smart I striped the drain plug :((
Anyone have one ?? Let me know

Thanks
Biggs
You might try calling around to any local machine shops to see if they can install a Time-Sert in the stripped hole. Some machine shops have a mobile tech that does on-site repairs, as well. One must be cautious of using a longer drain plug since the oil intake for the oil pump is directly above the screen on the original drain plug, which is the screen for the oil pump intake.

The threads should not strip if properly torqued. The required 48 ft-lb, or 65 Nm, does not feel very tight if one uses a 18 inch long torque wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have a lathe in my garage, that is what i am going to try to do, I will make a insert and use a 1/2" drain plug,
How important is that screen ???

Thanks
Biggs
 

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Discussion Starter #8
There is a oil filer for that , the screen on it is huge, i wonder what they want to filter with that, Gravel ?? hehehe jk I will try to keep it in there
 

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If there is anything big enough to be stopped by the screen in the motor you have a major problem that an oil change wouldn't help. When I installed the Fujimoto oil valve I left the screen out, no problems.:D Chumly
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I looked up that Fujimoto oil valve that is a cool idea, better then my steel insert hehe, every car should have that hehe
 

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You might try calling around to any local machine shops to see if they can install a Time-Sert in the stripped hole. Some machine shops have a mobile tech that does on-site repairs, as well. One must be cautious of using a longer drain plug since the oil intake for the oil pump is directly above the screen on the original drain plug, which is the screen for the oil pump intake.

The threads should not strip if properly torqued. The required 48 ft-lb, or 65 Nm, does not feel very tight if one uses a 18 inch long torque wrench.
Yeah, in a perfect world.... Fact remains that these plugs do tighten up when the motor gets warm and cools , plus there is that dis-similar metal thing going on. Over the the years I have changed a LOT of oil, and threads being stripped is very common. That is why most manufacturers use a softer material on the plug than the pan.That way you just tossed the plug, clean the threads and use a new plug. My old Corvair had a steel oil pan while the rest of the motor was mostly aluminum.

My drain plug hole got stripped with 90K on the odometer, on a Sunday morning. Luckily I found a longer plug and I was on my way. with over 122K miles, I have had no problems with oil starvation or removing the screen.

A time-sert is probably the best solution, but I'd be leery of drilling and tapping on an oil pan still on a motor (but that is just me) and the price for the parts is just about the same as an oil pan. The threads would be much stronger, and changing the oil pan would leave the same weak threads that have already proven they will fail eventually. Aluminum is not a good material for removing and installing bolts on a repeated basis. If I had to do it over again, I would have gone with the Fujimoto oil drain valve. Doesn't help much when it won't thread in the hole.. :icon_biggrin:
 

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Just a thought, if the threads were not just a touch longer, then the plug wouldn't hold. If the oil pickup inlet is positioned within the threaded area of the drain hole, does that make sense?sounds like a really messed up design. I know the pickup port for the oil is close in there (so I have been told) and the new longer plug is not a lot longer, maybe 1/4 inch or less. Just long enough to grab some undamaged thread. But like I said, been working for me the last 32K miles...
 

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Yeah, in a perfect world.... Fact remains that these plugs do tighten up when the motor gets warm and cools , plus there is that dis-similar metal thing going on. Over the the years I have changed a LOT of oil, and threads being stripped is very common. That is why most manufacturers use a softer material on the plug than the pan.That way you just tossed the plug, clean the threads and use a new plug. My old Corvair had a steel oil pan while the rest of the motor was mostly aluminum.
I don't know how you quantify "common" in terms of stripped drain plugs but I have been working on cars since the mid-1960s and have never stripped a drain plug. Maybe I'm not strong enough. Maybe it depends on who is pulling on the wrench. In any event, many cars these days use aluminium oil pans for structural reasons since some, like the smart, mount accessories to them. Also for packaging reasons due to space considerations. It is easier to cast a complex shape in aluminum rather than to make it from stamped steel.
 

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Most Aluminum pans use a steel insert around the drain hole, and a softer material for the plug.

Also been working on cars since the early '70s and spent a lot of time doing maint on taxi cabs and fleet vehicles where the oil was changed just about weekly because of the amount of time the motors were run (before there was synthetic oils). We used a manufactured "oil drain rubber plug" on some of the motors as it was easier to remove and install. Have not seen those for years but I wish I had one in my car now. Check with any shop that does 15-20 oil changes per week and they will have an assortment of replacement oil drain plugs. It may be more common than you think.

It usually gets stripped by the guy who put the plug in last, but the guy who removes it only to find it is stripped gets blamed. Probably not their fault. If you are the only one who performs the oil change, chances of a stripped plug are going to be small to non-existent Some shops let any idiot do the oil changes. I have had cars come in with 2 gaskets on the oil filter because the last guy didn't verify the old gasket came off. If they are lucky, it stays sealed, usually not and dumps the oil while driving down the road.

You are correct. with a little care, they can last a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well I Fixed my striped Drain plug problem.

Here is what i did .

I used some Permatex 8668 stripped thread repair kit, With a M22 x 1.25 Tap
I will not go trough all the details, the direction are in the package

Then i made this adapter plug on the lathe, I call it " Smart Plug FIX " :D
I made the threads as long as i can before it interfered with the oil pickup
And on the other end i use a M20 x1.25 Plug. On the plug i made a adapter so i can use the screen filter. I installed the " Smart Plug FIX " With blue lock tight, i should have used red but all i had was blue and to lazy to go to the store hehe., I used a rubber coated washer and a bit of ultra black for extra insurance,, its been 100km and its not leaking at all, Its a perfect permanent fix, and evening if your treads are still good, You can use this to avoid, striping them. :) I should start selling the " Smart Plug FIX " :D
I have a few more pictures but i cant upload more then the 3 :((
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yap it is made all of steel :) With red lock tight, it would be almost impossible to take out with out heat, and if the lube guy takes out the " Smart Plug FIX " instead of the drain plug, he should be kicked in the knee caps hehe

How can i add more pictures ??
 
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