Smart Car of America Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings, I did a search for "alternator" and read a lot of threads. I didn't see my particular question/situation so, please bear with me. If you know of previously posted thread, please forward it to me.


I have a 2009 ForTwo Passion. My ForTwo is a daily driver, and I have another car. I replaced the flexible muffler pipe myself on my ForTwo and it took a while (six weeks or more). When I got ready fire it up, the battery didn't have enough juice in it to start. It wasn't completely dead, just dead enough to not start. The battery is the original (5 years old.) The car has about 50K miles on it. So I put a 10 amp battery charger on it and after 30 minutes or so, I went to start it. It started just fine. The muffler pipe repair was working perfectly. Me and my friend were high fiving.


But then I looked at the dash and noticed the Battery/Alternator light was on. :( I thought maybe if I turn the car off and restart it would reset. But it didn't. I drove it about 15 miles. Nothing changed. Light still on.


So I put a voltmeter on the battery, while the car was running, and there was no alternator output at all. The car was running on the battery only. The charging system was perfectly fine before I changed the muffler pipe. I just can't imagine an alternator going out at 50K miles.


So, to be sure, I checked all the fuses, thinking there was a bad one possibly that maybe was connected to the regulator or something, all were good.


My question is, are there any other "fusible links", fuses or other devices that could of gone bad (possibly by me hooking up the battery charger:shrug:??) Or What? I don't want to take the alternator out and to an alternator shop to test it, only for them to say its ok.


When I was reading the other threads, some people talk about a battery recall from the dealer, and I know that internally shorted cells in batteries can damage an alternator. I doubt that the battery had that problem, because there was some charge left in the battery as I stated above. I never got a recall notice, does anyone know about that? Is the 2009 model in the recall?


BTW. I am 57 years old, have overhauled small block chevy motors, Holley Carbs, transmissions, rewired (4) old cars from the ground up) I'm a Radio Shack junkie, engineer, BattleBots, I have overhauled car generators (back when they had them) replaced diodes in my 1968 Camaro alternator. I know how charging systems work from the old days. BUT, I didn't plan on working on my Smart so soon. I would take it to the dealer, except they RAPE you. Since I have another car, I'm in no hurry to repair the Smart, but I would like to fix it before winter.


Does anyone have a good source for a Smart 2009 "overhaul" manual? Or I guess I could just google it.


Thanks for any consideration you may give me,


Dan
Rochester Hills, Michigan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Greetings, I did a search for "alternator" and read a lot of threads. I didn't see my particular question/situation so, please bear with me. If you know of previously posted thread, please forward it to me.


I have a 2009 ForTwo Passion. My ForTwo is a daily driver, and I have another car. I replaced the flexible muffler pipe myself on my ForTwo and it took a while (six weeks or more). When I got ready fire it up, the battery didn't have enough juice in it to start. It wasn't completely dead, just dead enough to not start. The battery is the original (5 years old.) The car has about 50K miles on it. So I put a 10 amp battery charger on it and after 30 minutes or so, I went to start it. It started just fine. The muffler pipe repair was working perfectly. Me and my friend were high fiving.



But then I looked at the dash and noticed the Battery/Alternator light was on. :( I thought maybe if I turn the car off and restart it would reset. But it didn't. I drove it about 15 miles. Nothing changed. Light still on.


So I put a voltmeter on the battery, while the car was running, and there was no alternator output at all. The car was running on the battery only. The charging system was perfectly fine before I changed the muffler pipe. I just can't imagine an alternator going out at 50K miles.


So, to be sure, I checked all the fuses, thinking there was a bad one possibly that maybe was connected to the regulator or something, all were good.


My question is, are there any other "fusible links", fuses or other devices that could of gone bad (possibly by me hooking up the battery charger:shrug:??) Or What? I don't want to take the alternator out and to an alternator shop to test it, only for them to say its ok.


When I was reading the other threads, some people talk about a battery recall from the dealer, and I know that internally shorted cells in batteries can damage an alternator. I doubt that the battery had that problem, because there was some charge left in the battery as I stated above. I never got a recall notice, does anyone know about that? Is the 2009 model in the recall?


BTW. I am 57 years old, have overhauled small block chevy motors, Holley Carbs, transmissions, rewired (4) old cars from the ground up) I'm a Radio Shack junkie, engineer, BattleBots, I have overhauled car generators (back when they had them) replaced diodes in my 1968 Camaro alternator. I know how charging systems work from the old days. BUT, I didn't plan on working on my Smart so soon. I would take it to the dealer, except they RAPE you. Since I have another car, I'm in no hurry to repair the Smart, but I would like to fix it before winter.


Does anyone have a good source for a Smart 2009 "overhaul" manual? Or I guess I could just google it.


Thanks for any consideration you may give me,


Dan
Rochester Hills, Michigan
Sorry to hear your having issues with your smart. Haven't had any issues with my '13 smart which just hit 60,000. If you need a smart encyclopedia Evilution - Smart Car Encyclopaedia is the place to go. Otherwise I would recommend a Hanse car repair manual.
Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
First, the smart does not use conventional fuse links. There are a 100 amp and a 200 amp fuses next to the battery. Since the car starts and runs they are good.

Second, if the engine control unit sees the voltage below 11.5 volts for longer than 3 minutes it tells the instrument cluster to turn on the battery/charging lamp. Therefore, check the alternator outptut at the alternator.

You stated you repaired the flex pipe for the exhaust. Did you weld it, and if so did you weld it on the car? If so, did you disconnect any of the electrical equipment?

If you do in fact require a replacement alternator they are available used on ebay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
@ SmartDigger


I only checked at the battery. That's a good idea to check at the alternator, I will do that. I figure if the ground cables were bad, a lot more things wouldn't be working? If you know the location of a particular one ~ let me know...
Thanks for the reply.
Dan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
reply to rustedwrench

First, the smart does not use conventional fuse links. There are a 100 amp and a 200 amp fuses next to the battery. Since the car starts and runs they are good.

Second, if the engine control unit sees the voltage below 11.5 volts for longer than 3 minutes it tells the instrument cluster to turn on the battery/charging lamp. Therefore, check the alternator outptut at the alternator.


You stated you repaired the flex pipe for the exhaust. Did you weld it, and if so did you weld it on the car? If so, did you disconnect any of the electrical equipment?


If you do in fact require a replacement alternator they are available used on ebay.


The battery was charged and always over 12 volts.
<Welding on car?> Very good idea, but no, I didn't weld the pipes on the car, they were off the car and I used acetylene gas torch...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,635 Posts
The battery was charged and always over 12 volts.
<Welding on car?> Very good idea, but no, I didn't weld the pipes on the car, they were off the car and I used acetylene gas torch...
A battery that measures less than 12.75-12.80 volts is discharged or bad. If your battery is original I suggest you replace it.

One can not properly evaluate a charging system with a marginal battery. As a battery ages or fails its internal resistance decreases which increases the load on the alternator. The alternator was not designed to recharge a dead or failing battery but only to replenish the current used to start the engine. A alternator that is overworked will produce excessive heat and eventually fail.

I am not saying that is what happened to your car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,472 Posts
A battery that measures less than 12.75-12.80 volts is discharged or bad. If your battery is original I suggest you replace it.

One can not properly evaluate a charging system with a marginal battery. As a battery ages or fails its internal resistance decreases which increases the load on the alternator. The alternator was not designed to recharge a dead or failing battery but only to replenish the current used to start the engine. A alternator that is overworked will produce excessive heat and eventually fail.

I am not saying that is what happened to your car.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top