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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yikes. I thought the battery would be the worst thing to go wrong with an electric vehicle! I had the 12V battery replaced last month ($700) and the HV battery was reporting over 70 miles of range. The car only has ~26,000 miles on it. One day to the next, I plugged in and after the usual clicking sounds, the display shows "Malfunction" where it usually displays the time left for the charge. The Mercedes dealer just quoted me $7487.95 to replace the battery charger (451-982-27-21) and the companion part charge port (451-540-13-06), with 4 hours of labor. Apparently the battery charger part costs $4900 alone. They refused to install a used part, and my local mechanic won't touch an electric car. I can't justify spending more than the car's value on this repair. After reading a post from another thread on a similar sounding $6000 repair, I ordered a used battery charger for $500 off of ebay and it should be here any day. I tried ordering a repar manual from repairmanuals.co, but they later refunded my $30 stating the manual was no longer available. I see another website called downloadworkshopmanuals.com, but research indicates that it is a scam.
The car still has 25% charge left, so I hope the diagnosis was right and I can replace this before my battery depletes.
I'm open to advice and especially a recommendation where to get a repair manual for replacing the battery charger?
 

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I'd start with avoiding whomever charged you $700 to replace your 12v battery. That battery costs maybe $200 on an expensive day and no way is it a $500 job to install it.

Good luck - hope you replacement charger fixes things for you.

Len
 

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Yikes. I thought the battery would be the worst thing to go wrong with an electric vehicle! I had the 12V battery replaced last month ($700) and the HV battery was reporting over 70 miles of range. The car only has ~26,000 miles on it. One day to the next, I plugged in and after the usual clicking sounds, the display shows "Malfunction" where it usually displays the time left for the charge. The Mercedes dealer just quoted me $7487.95 to replace the battery charger (451-982-27-21) and the companion part charge port (451-540-13-06), with 4 hours of labor. Apparently the battery charger part costs $4900 alone. They refused to install a used part, and my local mechanic won't touch an electric car. I can't justify spending more than the car's value on this repair. After reading a post from another thread on a similar sounding $6000 repair, I ordered a used battery charger for $500 off of ebay and it should be here any day. I tried ordering a repar manual from repairmanuals.co, but they later refunded my $30 stating the manual was no longer available. I see another website called downloadworkshopmanuals.com, but research indicates that it is a scam.
The car still has 25% charge left, so I hope the diagnosis was right and I can replace this before my battery depletes.
I'm open to advice and especially a recommendation where to get a repair manual for replacing the battery charger?
The car should be fine with the 25% charge as longs as the 12V battery is kept charged - conenct a trickle charger if the car sits more than two weeks. My understanding is that replacing the charger is a easy plug-and-play replacement, with ordinary tools. The signal wire connectors to the charger are like a puzzle that take a little figuring to disconnect - check a MB forum on the internet. If any codes need clearing, try to find a MB mechanic - not a dealer to do it.

To spend $700 to replace a battery is breathtaking. You can do it yourself for just the $150 cost of the battery. I think the dealers are geared to affluent clientele for whom $700, or $7000, or for that matter, 70,000 is jsut pocket change. That is why they hate the riff-raff Smart car owners so much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I should clarify. The $700 also included replacing a "sticky" relay they found when replacing the battery. The relay (Part# 002-524-48-19) was $143, battery (part# 451-982-00-08) was $191, and $353 for labor. Still pretty pricey, but seeing the non-standard size of the battery, I figured I was stuck going to the dealer (Flagship Motors). Hopefully providing the part# here will help someone else shop around.
 

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I should clarify. The $700 also included replacing a "sticky" relay they found when replacing the battery. The relay (Part# 002-524-48-19) was $143, battery (part# 451-982-00-08) was $191, and $353 for labor. Still pretty pricey, but seeing the non-standard size of the battery, I figured I was stuck going to the dealer (Flagship Motors). Hopefully providing the part# here will help someone else shop around.
The battery compartment accommodates other battery sizes. The size H5 available at discount parts stores is a bit longer but fits fine.
 

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I imagine it would be wise to disconnect the HV battery before touching the defective charger, but defer to anyone who has done this before or has the manual.
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I imagine it would be wise to disconnect the HV battery before touching the defective charger, but defer to anyone who has done this before or has the manual.
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If the key switch is turned off and the charger not plugged in, then the contactors in the battery are open and the orange DC wires to the charger are not energized. On top of that, there is an interlock that opens the contractors as soon as any bayonet-type orange cable connector is pulled. Also, it would take deliberate effort to come in contact with the positive and negative conductors on the female-ends of the cable connectors at once. Remember that a DC battery is not like AC service - the only "ground" that current can flow to is the negative terminal of the battery.

But yes, the factory does recommend pulling the service safety disconnect for all work on HV DC components per standard "lockout-tagout" electrical safety practice. They even specify pulling the connector when replacing the 12V battery for some reason - but this is not necessary - as long as the car is switched off. The safety disconnect can be pulled without triggering a code - as long as the car is witched off when doing so (per Moritz in the Smart Forum).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I appreciate the posts by everyone on the forum and was hoping to share a success story on this repair. With the failure to find a repair manual or an electric car mechanic, I lost my nerve and sold the car for parts while the battery still has charge. It was a fun electric car while it lasted.
 
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