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Discussion Starter #1
I found this trailer made by Aluma, their model # 6810-H. It's 10 ft long and 5'6" wide. The tongue adds another 4 ft for a total of 14 ft.

It comes with the bi-fold ramp that makes a solid ramp to drive the car up. The empty tongue weight it only 45 lbs. and the trailer itself is 500 lbs w/ the spare tire and tongue jack. Makes it real easy to move around for one person.

I weighed the tongue weight with the car on the trailer and it's only 150 lbs. I'm looking for a small aluminum tool type box to install on the tongue just to carry and secure a few things, including the tie-down straps.



I'm using the loop style side pull straps w/ ratchets. The ratchets are a little big for this car's weight, I'd like to have found something a little smaller, but they work good.

This trailer was $2450.00 w/spare and jack.
 

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I had looked at the same trailer a while back. Can't remember the weight rating on it but the smart would do fine on it. Actually you would want the 15" wheel upgrade as the standard 14" tires were the limiting factor from what I saw when I checked them out.
 

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That does look like a nice trailer.
I had thought of a trailer to carry another small car I own that can't be towed four down but instead bought the smart that could be towed four wheels down just to avoid the issues with the trailer.

So tell me, what is the reason why some people want to trailer their cars?
My reasoning for not trailering was that in addition to the added cost of the trailer and the trouble to load the car onto it and securing it and the added tow weight as well as increased length, you also have the problem of now dealing with three vehicles instead of two. If you enter a campsite and there is no 'drive-through' you will have to unload the trailer and the car and find a place for both of them. If only the car was an issue it just has to be disconnected and driven to wherever there is room - probably sideways in front of the motorhome.
There's also the issue of trailer storage when not using the RV.

Maybe a reason is to avoid tire wear - but the trailer tires will be wearing instead.
The car's suspension will still be working regardless.
It's understandable if the car can't be towed, but these cars can be.

We don't all do things the same way and there may be reasoning that I haven't considered. However, I don't regret just towing the car - mine has been towed for almost 10,000 miles now.
 

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I have two smarts and my father has one too, so that would be fitting a four-down towing setup on all the car$. Also, if I decide to upgrade to a different smart for whatever reason - once again no hassle of fitting it with a Blue Ox whatever your choice is.

Also, correct me if I'm wrong, but you have to have the key on the ignition for 4-down on the smart. On the trailer I'm not bothered with having to remember the key in the car if I stop while driving the motorhome.

Next is with a hitch ON my smarts the trailer I had looked at (same one?) weighed around 440lbs so if I find something I want nearby that won't fit IN my smart I can hook up the trailer and tow it behind the smart to get whatever I want/need.

Next up - I can always use an extra trailer :). A utility trailer is a nice thing to have around. A few stake pockets and you're set, or you don't even need the stake pockets if you don't want them.

Finally, when it's all said and done and you don't want your smart anymore you can keep the trailer or sell it for a pretty decent amount as aluminum trailers don't really depreciate too bad so you can get a good amount of your money back out of it. You could get your money back out of the 4 down towing setup but of course you'll need to remove it. (I know you could try to sell the smart to someone who wants it for use as a dinghy, so that is a thought too)

Of course those are the reasons I choose and like you said, everyone is different. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
The GTW is 2990 lbs. More then enough for the SmartCar. Many of the trailers I looked at had 13-inch wheels. This one has 14-inch. I guess I don't understand why you think the 14-inch wheels aren't enough. Why was this a limiting factor? They make a Model 6810 which is the same length & width but lighter in weight. It doesn't have the A-frame tongue arrangement. It also has 13-inch wheels and standard tires. The tires on this Model 6810-H (Heavy Duty) are Load Range C, Max Load 1760 lbs at 50psi. There true 4-ply, 2 Steel & 2 Poly tires.

I have always towed four down in the past, but I just didn't like the idea of this little dinky car, so close to the ground, etc. being yanked around behind the motorhome. I read where one guy hit a pot-hole with his motorhome, which he hardly noticed but even then he tried to slow down knowing the car would hit the same hole, but he was too late and blew one of the front tires on the Smart and did some damage to the front body panel. I agree this is probably rare, but still with all the different things that some of the guys have said here on the forum I opted for the trailer.

You're right about the suspension being utilized, but it's not going to be the same as if it were rolling on the ground. Plus the trailer has a good suspension which helps to reduce the car's suspension while being trailered. I'm also going to build a small aluminum platform across the front so I can carry not only a tool box, but other things as well. I too like the idea of having the trailer and being able to pull it with the Smartcar. I'm now looking for a tow bar to put on the SmartCar, any ideas?

Although I haven't towed a trailer in the past, I've had many friends who did and still do and they've said over the years it hasn't been that much of a hassle. Personally I can't say but I guess I'll find out in the near future.
 

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Thanks for your responses Bum-bling-B and b2forwo. There are advantages and disadvantages for both towing methods. I guess we opt for one or the other depending on our experiences and priorities.
 

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The GTW is 2990 lbs. ///
/// I'm also going to build a small aluminum platform across the front so I can carry not only a tool box, but other things as well.///
This is the answer to the Q I was thinking-- what else, along with a smart, could one pile on this trailer-- trailer and smart spares, tools or utility box, that kind of thing without overloading.

Thanks all.
 

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The GTW is 2990 lbs. More then enough for the SmartCar. Many of the trailers I looked at had 13-inch wheels. This one has 14-inch. I guess I don't understand why you think the 14-inch wheels aren't enough. Why was this a limiting factor? They make a Model 6810 which is the same length & width but lighter in weight. It doesn't have the A-frame tongue arrangement. It also has 13-inch wheels and standard tires. The tires on this Model 6810-H (Heavy Duty) are Load Range C, Max Load 1760 lbs at 50psi. There true 4-ply, 2 Steel & 2 Poly tires.
Sounds like the 6810 is what I was looking at which would explain the lighter weight. I also stand corrected and the standard tires were 13 inch with the optional ones being 14 inch. The 13 inch tires I looked at were flimsy (poor memory but I think it was around 1100lbs for a Max Load) and would just barely be within limits to haul the smart but the 14 inch tires make it OK. FWIW, I weigh my smart regularly...because I can. Checked it last week and it came out at 1840lbs - I have a drive-on scale at work.

The Aluma trailer was truly a VERY nice high quality trailer. I liked it a lot but of course the wife was against it. So I took my steel utility trailer I already had and fitted it with better tie-down points for around $100 and have been using that since.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
It doesn't have any brakes. It's GVCW is under 2900 lbs which is why on this and similar models they didn't put brakes on it. With the SmartCar it's GCVW is 2300 lbs.

The hubs are the same ones they use on the heavier trailers so brakes can be added. I'll be adding them myself. I just need to buy the brakes and wire them in. I found some at Cabela's that are electric disk brakes. Much smaller and lighter weight so I'm going to look at those.
 

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Thanks for the info. Looks like California & Nevada require trailers with a GVW over 1500 lbs to be fitted with brakes. Does anyone know if this applies to trailers registered outside those states but just passing through ?
 

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Thanks for the ino. Looks like California & Nevada require trailers with a GVW over 1500 lbs to be fitted with brakes. Does anyone know if this applies to trailers registered outside those states but just passing through ?
I expect it applies to all vehicles operated in the state. Years ago I got a ticket in Wyoming for driving on an expired license even though the license was not considered expired from my home state. The judge said my ignorance of Wyoming's laws was no excuse. That it was my responsibility to drive by all the laws of the state I was in.

Trailer Brake Requirements For Towed Vehicles

New York is even lower.
 

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Could you tell me where to get these tie down straps? I am going to use a 10x6 all aluminum trailer but can't find straps.........thanks
 

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The trailer idea is our preferred way of towing as there is no wear and tear on the car and we have more than one smart car. The trailer stores mostly under the back of the motorhome. Our trailer was built in California to California Spec, does not have brakes and has a GVWR of 2500 (corrected on edit, had to check) pounds so I'm not sure about the brake legality thing. The axle is rated for more. Unlike towing four down I can back up. Handy for overnight stays in Travel centres or dealing with wrong turns etc. We have towed all ways including tow dolly and without a doubt this is our preferred mode of towing.

 

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That is our goal (awesome RV+ a smart).

It must be 10+ times while pulling our simple car topper on wheels with smartie (tag o' long).

The RV, Harley, & Goldwing owners were the nicest people we ever met.

Nice setup.
 

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I expect it applies to all vehicles operated in the state. Years ago I got a ticket in Wyoming for driving on an expired license even though the license was not considered expired from my home state. The judge said my ignorance of Wyoming's laws was no excuse. That it was my responsibility to drive by all the laws of the state I was in.

Trailer Brake Requirements For Towed Vehicles

New York is even lower.
This is not a link to Amy official weight limits. For example, California is 3000 pounds unless it is a trailer coach or camping trailer.

BC is also wrong as the formula for requirement of brakes is a little more complex than that. Those are the only two I checked as they are home bases for us and they are both wrong so not sure how many others are wrong. Best to check official websites as opposed to a vendors website.
 
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