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I like the electric vehicle.

I often think about what I'd do if I actually got an Electric Drive and had to charge it outside my home at a place that doesn't have an EV charger.

Run an extension cord to an outlet nearest your parking space?

Well apparently that is something you shouldn't do...This guy was arrested for charging his EV for a total of 20 minutes while at a game. A calculated 5 cents of power...

Electric car owner arrested for ?stealing? 5 cents of power

I don't see the huge issue here, charging an electric car using a normal outlet is practically no worse than charging a dead laptop and/or phone while waiting for your delayed flight to arrive.

Obviously, you shouldn't hook up your car to the local Wal-Mart and leech energy from them overnight or for days, but for a measly 20 minutes?
 

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Electric car owner charged with "theft of power" - 5 cents worth

And so it begins....

By Daniella Silva, NBC News

A Georgia man found himself in handcuffs after charging his electric car outside a middle school where his son was playing tennis in what police alleged was unlawful “theft” of county power worth roughly five cents.

Kaveh Kamooneh, of Decatur, said he was attending a Saturday morning tennis practice session for his 11-year-old son on Nov. 2 when he plugged in his electric car at a power outlet outside Chamblee Middle School.
:)

'Theft of power' lands electric-car driver in jail - U.S. News

It occurs to me that since his taxes are paying for the public school, including the electricity to run it, his "theft" is a bit of LEO theater.
 

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It occurs to me that since his taxes are paying for the public school, including the electricity to run it, his "theft" is a bit of LEO theater.

Under your line of thinking, you could break into your public library and help yourself to a few computers, since it is only wink-theft-wink, and since you already presumably pay for it with your taxes.
 

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Under your line of thinking, you could break into your public library and help yourself to a few computers, since it is only wink-theft-wink, and since you already presumably pay for it with your taxes.
Hardly comparable, and his "theft" apparently involved no illegal entry (except by the cops entering his car without his permission.) Would be nice to see how those school chargers are marked, if they are. This goes back to the idea of municipal charging points as part of the local infrastructure; why not, we're paying the taxes anyway. :)
 

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Let's see, 5 cents versus the cost to prosecute and defend.
A warning indeed would be in order. This is heavy handed justice.
What valuable lesson did the child learn at school on that day?!!!!!!
This is about as ridiculous as jail time would be for a blown headlamp.
I hope the judge has the presence of mind to warn and then throw this out of court.
 

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I agree a warning should have been given if this really was an issue. There may be a back story where he had been already warned. I drive one of the Smart EDs, and unguarded outlets are a great temptation- but fundamentally I think that it is indisputable that SOMEONE pays for every kW-Hr, and even tax payer funded 110V outlets have budgets to meet. For the sake of al lthe ED users out there, we all need to make our protocols civil and respectful (vice having an attitude of entitlement), no matter how small the actual energy may be. If this guy used only 5 cents, that's less than a quarter of a kW-Hr- about ONE MILE. What was the point?
 

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Under your line of thinking, you could break into your public library and help yourself to a few computers, since it is only wink-theft-wink, and since you already presumably pay for it with your taxes.
If I plug my laptop into the power outlet at my local library, am I stealing electricity too?

When my students come to class and plug in their iPhones and computers, is that stealing too?

This is NOT an easy question, but at what point is the taking of electricity a crime?


Bob Diaz
 

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I would never charge at an open plug. The electricity is not mine because I didn't pay for it. Then again, I drive a Volt so the NEED for some amps isn't that pressing....... ;-)
 

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-Laptops and phones are a different class of electricity consumers, although I've been fussed at in Europe for using outlets in public areas. The energy that is required for transportation purposes is several orders of magnitude more than that needed for a phone or computer, so it's not that difficult a judgement call to make.
In most cases, politely asking beforehand is probably the most successful and sustainable strategy.
 

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I don't see the huge issue here, charging an electric car using a normal outlet is practically no worse than charging a dead laptop and/or phone while waiting for your delayed flight to arrive.

Obviously, you shouldn't hook up your car to the local Wal-Mart and leech energy from them overnight or for days, but for a measly 20 minutes?
It's a tough call, technically he was taking power from a municipality without permission, regardless of his having paid any taxes. There is no stated notification saying that he is allowed to use the outlets. Would he have done the same at the local police station or from City Hall?

He didn't break anything to get the power, so it could be considered similar to drinking from the water fountains. But the fountains are implied for use by anyone, the electrical socket is not.

He did not have explicit permission from anyone on the campus. As a comparative example, thinking back to my high school days. The hall monitor would have given me a hard time if I'd tried to recharge a walkman on an external outlet.

If one person is allowed to charge at any available municipal socket, then cannot every person do the same? In a sense by ignoring the issue, the officer would have been setting a precedent that says anyone can charge their electric car on any available electrical socket at a municipal building. That could become chaotic, eventually.

But this situation does make a solid point in need for many more publicly accessible charging stations. Had there been a publicly accessible charging station nearby there would have been no issue.

Granted we don't know the full back story on why the fellow plugged in, in the first place? As any ED owner would know that via the 110V charger, you'd be fortunate to pick up 2 miles of range with 20 minutes of charge.

================

Update: After having read the report from the news station, I see now why the officer arrested the man. Most of the blogs carrying this are running on the exasperation of the minor amount of electricity, but they skip the fact that Mr. Kamooneh was argumentative with the officer.

In my observed experience, arguing with an officer drastically increases the chances of getting arrested. If the Mr. Kamooneh had conceded it to an accidental action, the officer would probably have left the issue alone.
 

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I don't see the huge issue here, charging an electric car using a normal outlet is practically no worse than charging a dead laptop and/or phone while waiting for your delayed flight to arrive.
People have been arrested for that too. Makes no difference the amount, apparently ... and I would argue justifiably.

Homeless people have notoriously been arrested for using public recepticals to charge their government supplied cell phones. In my view, that is more outrageous than charging the owner of a $30,000 vehicle for stealing power.

But, I'm a radical who feels the underpowered downtrodden are abused in almost every way, so kindly disregard.

Neon, in your subject line, why did you put the word "stealing" in quotation marks? Stealing is stealing.

Me thinks some EV owners feel they should be given a free ticket.

Likewise, it irritates me to see people at the gasoline pump lifting the fuel line to drain it, knowing full well they're ripping the next customer off for a few Cents worth of fuel.
 

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The mods really need to merge this thread with this one: http://www.smartcarofamerica.com/forums/f170/jail-5-cents-electricity-60042/

When the facts came out, it's really isn't a surprise the guy was arrested. His son doesn't go to the school. He had run-ins with the school staff before, and was belligerent to the officer. He was in fact, prohibited from the school grounds unless he asked permission. The guy was there getting a private tennis lesson. Of course, modern media likes to ignore the facts.... instead they just want a good headline...:cool:
 

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Ahhhh, The REST of the story, as Paul Harvey used to say.
It is apparent that Mr. Kahmooneh grew up in a different culture.
 

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I got harassed once for charging my cell phone at a rest area. I had been living in a 74 Scout that I was driving cross country about 200 miles a day. It was a pretty low point in my life. The truck was running poorly, making the trip more difficult, I barely had the gas money to make the trip' I hadn't slept more than a couple hours at a time for days, and everything I owned in the world was in the back of the truck. I had no car charger, and the socket in the truck didn't work anyway. I just couldn't believe that someone would hassle me for pennies of power. You could look at me and see that I was not in a good place.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
And that alone is why I think this entire debate is stupid. No, you shouldn't go and charge a car from empty to full on power that isn't yours, but is a few minutes (or even an hour) really a big deal?
 
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