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Discussion Starter #1
I just looked at my May electric bill.

Super off-peak, about 16¢/KWh
Off-peak about 18¢/KWh

And, are you ready for this...

Peak (noon to 7:00pm) 44¢/KWh

So if I charged at peak times I would have to pay 8 bucks to "fill up" my Smart.

Needless to say, people in my house better go naked and drape bags of ice around their necks before they even think of running the A/C during peak hours.
 

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I just looked at my May electric bill.

Super off-peak, about 16¢/KWh
Off-peak about 18¢/KWh

And, are you ready for this...

Peak (noon to 7:00pm) 44¢/KWh

So if I charged at peak times I would have to pay 8 bucks to "fill up" my Smart.

Needless to say, people in my house better go naked and drape bags of ice around their necks before they even think of running the A/C during peak hours.

ouch, that is quite high.. did you call them to see if you can switch to a non-TOU based billing , and get a flat rate. i have seen this happen a lot while lurking in Tesla forums.

out of curiosity, whats your other non-ev vehicle?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Besides the ED, I have a Sequoia, a Hyundai Veloster, a Volvo S60, a Buick Park Avenue and a Kawasaki motorcycle in my driveway or garage. And a 20' Trophy.

TOU is saving me a lot of money, since I only used 210 KWh during peak charging time and 920 off-peak. But the 210 peak KWH cost me more than the 900 off peak ones did.
 

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Besides the ED, I have a Sequoia, a Hyundai Veloster, a Volvo S60, a Buick Park Avenue and a Kawasaki motorcycle in my driveway or garage. And a 20' Trophy.

TOU is saving me a lot of money, since I only used 210 KWh during peak charging time and 920 off-peak. But the 210 peak KWH cost me more than the 900 off peak ones did.

^ i'd be tempted to trade one of those vehicles for some solar panels. In fact, I'm adding them right now during my new home construction; also an SDG&E customer.
 

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I'm so glad for my 5.9-6.9 cents per kwh at every hour of every day that stays constant in the summer. Yay for Ohio and electricity generation choice! Now I just need an ED so I can get huge MPGe numbers... :D
 

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I just looked at my May electric bill.
Even at the high rate though, assuming you get about 3.0 m/kWh, that's about 14.6¢/mile, which is equivalent to a 27mpg car for fuel costs (assuming $4/gallon). The off-peek rate is ~6¢/mile, the same as a 66mpg car, much more reasonable. That's not even touching the lower maintenance costs and such.

Still, 44¢ is really high (over 3x the national average), and higher than any state average in the continental US by a 2x margin. (Hawaii averages 38¢/kWh, which is the highest in the US.)

Something's not right if you're paying that for a residential rate in the continental US. Time to call the public service commission and see what's going on.
 

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Something's not right if you're paying that for a residential rate in the continental US. Time to call the public service commission and see what's going on.

Woody, did you read the information at the link I provided above your post?

SDG&E's new pricing will revert to a two-tier program that does not artificially benefit low-end users to the crippling detriment of high-end users.

Tiered rates, then and now

For decades, people simply paid baseline and nonbaseline electric rates. You’d get a certain amount of electricity at the lowest (baseline) rate to cover basic needs, depending on your climate zone and the season.

The nonbaseline rate applied to all use above your baseline allowance.

In 2001, to encourage conservation, California lawmakers established a multi-tier rate structure that linked progressively higher prices per kilowatt-hour to increased levels of electricity use.

However, the structure also froze rates for Tiers 1 and 2 for nearly a decade. As a result, rate increases applied only to the Tier 3 and 4 rates. Although the cap was lifted in 2010:

Customers in Tier 1 pay about 20% less than the cost to serve them.
Customers in Tier 4 pay about 50% more than the cost to serve them.
Current Tier 3 and 4 rates are more than double the Tier 1 and 2 rates.
 
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