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Discussion Starter #1
what is the process called when the coolant is changed with a machine and how does it work. has anyone had it done this way and how long does it take. is this something any shop could do if they had this equipment or is it specialized MB equipment.

It's so hard for me to do I'm thinking about having a shop (not MB) do it and install Graves Waterless atf so I never have to change it again.

thanks guys for the info
 

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It is normally called a 'flush', however you will want a drain and fill done using a negative pressure method where the old fluid is pulled out under pressure and new fluid is pulled in to replace the old fluid. Had it done on my smart at an independent service shop - cost around $100 for a standard coolant exchange - not the Waterless.

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Discussion Starter #4
no, haven't tested it but when I bought the car there were no maintenance records and being the preventative maintenance person I am I figure a car 9 years old with 39000 miles needs to be changed.
 

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...for about $3 you can purchase a whole variety....from paper strips to hydrometer style testers...

Jetfuel....next...
 

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...for about $3 you can purchase a whole variety....from paper strips to hydrometer style testers...

Jetfuel....next...
I have read...
Reading the multimeter. A reading of .4 volts or less means the coolant is good. ... In fact, worn coolant becomes a pretty darn good electrical conductor, accelerating internal electrolysis. The good news is that it's pretty easy to check the conductivity of your coolant with a digital multimeter.https://www.familyhandyman.com/auto...e/coolant-testing-with-a-multimeter/view-all/

If you have a multimeter can't hurt to check it out.
 

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If you have a multimeter can't hurt to check it out.
...yep Jo...you could use a voltmeter too...I was going to post that but decided not to...it is a very good way to determine the condition of your cooling fluid when a lot magnetic corrosive particles are suspended in the liquid...something you'll find a lot on big heavy iron blocks...

Jetfuel...sticking with the paper method
 
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