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Discussion Starter #1
I'm on my third day without plugging in, and will do some driving tomorrow (groceries, and possibly Dairy Queen with my youngest son) to get below 10% SOC before I recharge using my cheap Ontario weekend off-peak utility rate.

This beauty has so much more range now that the snow is gone. At 100% SOC, it was 70km average in the coldest weeks, to well over 110km listed on the dash range estimator.

It's been an EV week for me, saw a Mitsubishi i-MiEV today, a Telsa on Wednesday, and my neighbours new Leaf quite a few times...spring has sprung.:laugh:
 

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Some dealers should not buy "outside the box?"

:loser:

Found a low mileage 2013 ED cabrio up in Ohio that had been bought at auction by a dealer who is NOT familiar with the inner workings of an EV.

Called them to make sure it was available for a good "tire kicking" and my first question floored them - is the battery pack owned or rented? They had no idea what I was talking about . . . :giggle:

They think the battery pack is owned "because they bought it at auction." :whistle:

But it got better, now the salesman CAN'T FIND IT? LOOOONG story short, it hadn't been plugged in for some time and after sitting in the cold winter the battery pack had dropped below 30% and didn't want to play?

Of course they plugged it in but no luck. Told them of a few of the EV nuances to include the impact of cold weather and that there are two batteries - they were unaware of there being a 12 volt battery.

Out of total ignorance to the product they have had it schlepped over to the local M-B dealer who may or may not speak smart ED? :twak:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm on my third day without plugging in
Plugged in late yesterday.
When I got in it today, the range estimate was 93KM.
Meanwhile, I drove 25KM today, and the range still says 82KM...

Leaf owners call their range field on their dash a GOM (guess-o-meter) . :)

Looks like I should get to mid-week until needing a recharge at this rate...this spring weather is fantastic for range...
 

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Having a Tesla, and had a LEAF, running your battery low and then charging isn't great for its longevity. Li-ion batts like to be at around 80% for everyday, and when you have a trip, do the 100% charge! and try to use it soon after reaching the 100% level. These batteries don't do well, with being left at 100% for long periods. Also, if you can select a charge level, ( and I don't know if the smart ED has this control) if you go on a vacation, charge it to 50%. If you can select a daily level, use 80% for battery longevity. If you need the range, don't be afraid to charge to 100%, and USE it.........just time your charge for ending near when you leave.
Don't fret about high amp home chargers. I charge my Tesla everyday, with 240, and 30 amps. You can't up the size of the 3.3 kWh charger, onboard the smartED. THATS THE LIMIT.
240 volt is very convenient, fast, and actually is a little cheaper to use than 110v for the same purposes .
Hope this helps, I've had a little experience, and wanted to tell folks if they can , not to treat an electric car like a gas car, avoiding charging, and waiting till empty, like ICE cars.
 

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:loser:

Found a low mileage 2013 ED cabrio up in Ohio that had been bought at auction by a dealer who is NOT familiar with the inner workings of an EV.

But it got better, now the salesman CAN'T FIND IT? LOOOONG story short, it hadn't been plugged in for some time and after sitting in the cold winter the battery pack had dropped below 30% and didn't want to play?

Of course they plugged it in but no luck. Told them of a few of the EV nuances to include the impact of cold weather and that there are two batteries - they were unaware of there being a 12 volt battery.

Out of total ignorance to the product they have had it schlepped over to the local M-B dealer who may or may not speak smart ED? :twak:
Just for general info, this is called "Bricking" an electric vehicle. And it means exactly what it sounds like, the vehicle is now a "BRICK" sitting in the parking lot.

The way to bring it back to life is to use a standard 12v jump box on the 12v Aux battery (under the pass footwell) and then plug it into a 240v charger (and leave the jump box or a trickle charger connected)? After a while the DC/DC converter SHOULD bring enough life back into the 12v to "wake" up the computer and then you have a working vehicle again?

As long as there are not other issues present?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Having a Tesla, and had a LEAF, running your battery low and then charging isn't great for its longevity. Li-ion batts like to be at around 80%
The Smart ED has a fair amount of capacity under 0% SOC. I've personally attempted to test how much, but got bored after driving 10 km on "empty" (0% SOC reading the entire time) and not running out. So "low" is relative.


These batteries don't do well, with being left at 100% for long periods.
The Smart ED manual recommends leaving the car plugged in when not driving for long periods of time as per the manual:
Notes on battery care
Avoid storing and transporting the vehicle
at high temperatures for extended periods
of time (e. g. container transport).
When out of use for longer periods of time,
connect the vehicle to a voltage supply.
If the vehicle is not connected to a voltage
supply, it must remain within a temperature
range of -20C to 40C
When the vehicle is exposed to tempera-
tures below -25C for longer than
seven days, irreversible damage by frost
can occur.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If you can select a daily level, use 80% for battery longevity. If you need the range, don't be afraid to charge to 100%
The Smart ED has no such option to limit charge, the car will always attempt to charge to 100%.


Don't fret about high amp home chargers. I charge my Tesla everyday, with 240, and 30 amps. You can't up the size of the 3.3 kWh charger, onboard the smartED. THATS THE LIMIT.
240 volt is very convenient, fast, and actually is a little cheaper to use than 110v for the same purposes .
True. However, in my circumstance, the 110V is the superior EVSE to use, as I recharge overnight to take advantage of the low cost (7.5c/kwh) overnight rates here in Ontario when our Nuclear plants are typically throttled down by venting stream and wasting that energy. If I used L2, my charge would end too soon, or I'd need to walk out to the car to start the charge late at night. Plugging in the slower L1 charger makes more sense, as it takes 8 hours typically from 50% SOC to 100% for me, which is better than I need, as I plug the car in from 6pm till I drive away at 8AM.
 

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The absolute worst thing you can do to a Li-Ion battery pack is to NOT recharge it ASAP. Bragging can't hold a candle to the damage you do leaving the battery half dead and idle. It shortens its life by a LOT and these pigs are just too expensive to leave this way. To park it next to a wall outlet and NOT plug it in just so you can brag about charging it once a week is simply INSANE....
 

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Just for general info, this is called "Bricking" an electric vehicle. And it means exactly what it sounds like, the vehicle is now a "BRICK" sitting in the parking lot.

The way to bring it back to life is to use a standard 12v jump box on the 12v Aux battery (under the pass footwell) and then plug it into a 240v charger (and leave the jump box or a trickle charger connected)? After a while the DC/DC converter SHOULD bring enough life back into the 12v to "wake" up the computer and then you have a working vehicle again?

As long as there are not other issues present?
It's BRICKED if the 12v jump won't wake the system up. What happens is that not only was the car left sitting way too long without being charged, somebody innocently trying to get the car to wake up got it to wake up only to use the last of its remaining emergency power and therefore bricking the battery.
 

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The absolute worst thing you can do to a Li-Ion battery pack is to NOT recharge it ASAP.
Where did you get that from?

It's actually exactly the opposite: the worst thing you can do to a Lithium battery is to keep it charged full all the time. Lithium batteries aging accelerates disproportionally at higher cell voltage, as well as at higher temperature. That's why your laptop battery won't hold a charge after you left it plugged in on your desk 24/7 for six months.

It would be great if the smart (like Leaf and some others) allowed setting it to charge only to 80 or 90%. But then, I have BAP, so I don't care. Maybe BAP will motivate Mercecdes to work on improving battery life? Sounds like a simple SW upgrade would help.
 
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