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Discussion Starter #1
Hi gang - I haven't posted on here for several years, but I still have my account. My wife has been driving our 2013 Pure 100 miles a day for work. We started Jan of 2017 with 20,000 miles and just last week she put it over 86,000 miles! I've done oil changes, brake maintenance, had new tires installed, replaced front wheel bearings, and just kept up on maintenance on the Smart. We do our grocery shopping with it and have absolutely enjoyed the little car. It's everything we ever wanted in a little car and love every little quirk about it.

On one of my maintenance sessions, I had to remove the strut from the cast iron housing that holds the wheel bearing. I did not have the tool for spreading the part that holds the strut and so I'm trying to find the tools that are featured on the evilution site. Particularly the spreader and strut clamp found here: Evilution - Smart Car Encyclopaedia - you may need to have a subscription to see the picture of the tools but I'll include them in this message. The clamp (tool1.jpg) I found in the UK Genuine Smart Car 450/451/452 Suspension Shocker Workshop Removal Tool NEW | eBay and am attempting to have a reshipper send it to me. The other tool I'm trying to find is (specialtool.jpg) with a MB part number of 451 589 00 31 00

The spreading tool is a rather complicated looking thing, but I'd love to have it. In lieu of being able to find it, I was wondering if anyone has used the spreading tool for VWs that is featured on the Samstag site (samstag.png)? The reason I ask is if I can get away with the socket, it's cheaper and obtainable, but my main concern is if the socket would tend to spread the clamp father than what is safe to thereby risking cracking the housing. I know I've seen someone who made a clamp out of a piece of oak to grab hold of the strut and that's fine - but I like a pro tool that can I can keep in the toolbox I carry with the car so that I always have my repair tools ready to go.

Thanks for reading my message and I'm hopeful I can get some help from someone.

silent
 

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2009 451 Rally Red, Pennzoil Platinum Euro 5W-40, Wix XP 51356, 185/55R15 tires, 44 psl
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I suggest you give Rock Auto a look...

I see Schrader TPMS sensors for $22, and Wix 51356 oil filters for around $5...

Look for 10% off coupon codes on Retail Me Not dot Com...

Another place to look for parts is Autobahn Smart...
 

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Regarding 451 589 00 31 00 looks like some sources in Europe or India may have it. Can also Google search W451589003100 should be the same.
Saw it here: W451589003100 автозапчасть для Mercedes Benz купить по оптовой цене
The second one 451 589 00 63 00 or W451589006300 saw it here: Suspension Clamp Tool - Made in England
Third one you get the gist (W)126589001000 seen here T30 Torx Bit

No affiliation or experience with sellers except for ECS which is here in the US I have bought from them...
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Thank you for the reply with those part numbers. I've already gotten a couple of leads so I thank you! In the meantime I found this video:
which shows a guy doing a very simple job of it using a drill bit as a spacer, the pinch bolt, and a flat piece of metal. He simply threads the bolt in on the threaded side and pushes against the flat piece of metal until he gets the knuckle spread apart to where he wants it, then slips the solid shank of a drill bit into the gap and presto - simple tool and so simple that of course I didn't think of it.

I may still get the tool just for the sake of getting it since it's so hard to come by. It would at least be something not too hard to copy with a milling machine should someone want to make a copy, but really - why bother if you can use a drill bit, a bolt, and piece of metal. :)

I love my smart cars!

silent
 

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When I replaced the struts on my spare car I did much like the guy in the video, anything that causes a bit of spread is all you need; even a wedge would work.
As for the clamp to hold the shaft, I did something different. I used a 13/16" spark plug socket (has a hex at the top of the socket to grip with a wrench) on top of the strut mount under the hood and slid a 7mm allen down the throat of the socket. Hold the allen in place and turn the socket, viola!

If what I'm describing isn't clear let me know and I'll try to take some pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I like your idea and that sounds great! Most of those spark plug sockets have a hex end so you can put a wrench, vise-grip, or crescent wrench on the end to secure it. I think you are "supposed" to hold the shaft steady while you undo the bolt aren't you? Thanks for the tip! With MB pulling the Smart out of America, it's only a matter of time before our support goes to dwindling and then to non-existent. I intend to grab up Smarts when I find them because it'll be quite a few years before anyone cares about them and I can get them for a song. That's how it used to be with the old air-cooled VWs until internet came on the scene and a new generation of people wanted them and drive the price through the roof.

silent
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Really nice. Thanks for sharing those tools and your technique. The main tool that I'd like to get is that one that spreads the the struts apart. Even though I have found the cheap fix in that video, I still would like the tool to add to my list of tools. It seems like you can control the opening of the strut clamp a lot better so that you are only opening it the minimum amount to get the job done. As far as the piece that holds the strut from turning, I like your method. Thanks for your reply!

silent
 

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I haven't replaced struts yet, by my 09 is going to need them, so I too will need a solution. I'm thinking to buy a set of used strut assemblies, so I can take my time, and minimize down time.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That's what I was thinking of doing was getting a couple of used strut assemblies and rebuilding them - replace the bearings as well and then all I have to do is swap out the entire thing. At the very least just get one to practice on. There doesn't seem to be many out here in the midwest USA.

Today my Moog sway links showed up. I like them because they can be greased because they come with zerks. I could have gotten used oem ones for half the price from autobahn, but I wanted to get something good so I did.

silent
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Absolutely - less than half the life of a greasable unit and you get to pay for the privilege. My grandfather taught me years ago how you could buy the cheaper ball joints and very carefully drill a hole in the metal cap using a greased drill bit to catch the shavings. Then he would thread in his own zerk. Sometimes the boots would rot off and he'd still keep them greased because in his day, you greased the front ends of Model T and Model A cars ad-naseum and so it was just part of his annual maintenance schedule. I honestly do not remember him ever replacing a tie rod once he converted it to greased unit.

One time he was disgusted about his squeaking heater fan on his 1970 Bel Air. He drilled into the bearing, soldered in some copper wire on either end, soldered it in a Y shape, and ran the copper tubing to the inner fender lip where he finished capping it off with some duct tape folded over. He would just put a little 3 in 1 oil down the tube every so often and never had to replace the heater motor ever again.

You can make things last far longer than the manufacturer intended if you really want to.

silent
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
I just wanted to share the part number of the MOOG box I received with the greasable sway links. It takes a T30 bit and a 15mm wrench/spanner to get them off. I used a plethora of tools (typical MB way) including a 15mm socket, a T30 T-handle, T30 bit clamped in a vice grip, and a bigger wrench to act as a cheater to loosen the old sway link.

The replacement part from MOOG does not come with a torx hole. Instead you use the 15mm on the thread side and I used a 19mm wrench (because my kit doesn't have an 18mm wrench for some odd reason) to secure the opposite side. There was just enough room for everything to fit and I did the entire job by hand, taking my time, having to move my car in the warehouse by hand, jack it up, remove the tire, then do the other side, etc. in about 1.5 hrs. The actual removing and replacing of the parts probably took no more than 10 to 15 minutes per side.

This is the part number from the box and this time, no watermark required.

silent
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I just got confirmation that my official MB strut tool has been shipped. I had to pay a pretty penny for it, but I wanted the tool because I can control just how far apart I spread the knuckle that squeezes the strut cartridge and plus, specialized tools are just...well...cool! :) When it arrives, I'll make sure and share pictures of it. I haven't had to replace the struts yet, but I'm sure that time is coming. I had to order the tool from Denmark and last I saw DHL had it in Belgium. The price we pay for our specialized tools! :)

Update on 2-2-21: It showed up yesterday! If anyone would like to see the tool, I'll share the pictures. Unless I get anyone who would like to see them, I won't bother for now.

silent
 
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