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Yes, Nov 12 here in mid-NC snowing hard but to warm to accumulate.
Looks beautiful out the front of my smart!
 

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I can't wait until the road gets covered with snow again. So much fun driving in the snow. :D
 

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The first time i drove my Smart in the snow it was pretty cool. The best part is seeing the stunned look on peoples faces when they saw me come to work the day after a huge snowmagedon
 

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...thought I was going to test the Indiana snow today....but...turned around and headed back to Florida...St Augustine...

Jetfuel...62*F......I'll take it.
 

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I've only driven my smart in snow once. I was impressed.

It was a longish snowy drive, from Dothan, Alabama to Atlanta, Georgia.
 

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Is it a MUST to have snow tires? Yesterday first day in snow with Smart. Traction control came on and hit a few ice patches... interesting drive to work... just wasn't real comfortable not knowing how it was going to handle.

All in all wasn't enough snow to really do much but the ice gave a few interesting moments.
 

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Just for curiosity... Do you normally put them on the rear or all four? Do Smart Owners buy separate rims or just swap out tires?
 

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I have 4 front steelies from my 450 that I use as winter wheels for my 451. I run 145/65R15 Blizzak WS-60 all around in the winter.
 

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In Cincinnati, we just don't get enough snow for snow tires to be worth the hassle as fas as I'm concerned. In the 12 years I've had my truck, I've used the 4-wheel drive less than a dozen times, and haven't driven more than 50 miles using it. Around here, the main problem isn't the snow, it's the fools who think 4WD means they can still drive 70+ on snow, ice, slush, etc. and still steer and stop like the roads are dry.
-Bob
 

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Around here, the main problem isn't the snow, it's the fools who think 4WD means they can still drive 70+ on snow, ice, slush, etc. and still steer and stop like the roads are dry.
Amen to that! :)

"Whatcha mean my 3 ton, 8 passenger 4WD uber SUV with one person on board can't do 75 in the unplowed fast lane in a blizzard while I'm eating breakfast cuz I left late for work? It's got 4WD ain't it!"
 

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As I learned last season, there just isn't enough snowfall around here to justify snow tyres. Any snow that hits the pavement is immediately obliterated by Illinois thirsty road department.

I ended up wearing out my snow tyres due to a lack of snow to drive them on! :D
 

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still drive 70+ on snow, ice, slush, etc. and still steer and stop like the roads are dry.
One of the many reasons I run an ice radial in the winter. I can safely drive at the posted speed limit, for me it is mostly 50-60 mph. When I catch up to those on all season tires driving 20 under the limit, I can safely pass them and go about my business.

It costs $75 to $100 per season for winter tires, my time and safety is worth alot more than that.

I've never understood switching to a thirstier vehicle in the winter when a tire change is more than sufficient to get the job done.

The only days I miss work are when the roads are closed.
 

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Just for curiosity... Do you normally put them on the rear or all four? Do Smart Owners buy separate rims or just swap out tires?
All four. Blizzaks. Swapping out will cost you about $85 each time with TPMS, or you can buy a set of steelies (basic Pure steel wheels) on ebay for about $85 a wheel. Once mounted, Discount Tire will swap them out each winter & spring for free, so you'll recover the cost of the wheels in about 4 years. :) P.S. The only thing that'll really slow you down in winter is the "high-center" of packed snow & ice that sometimes forms when the streets aren't plowed and other vehicles using the same wheel tracks over and over get really deep, leaving a center that is too high for the smart to clear. :(
 

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The smart's short wheelbase helps it feel responsive and agile in good conditions. But the downside is that when things go bad it happens very quickly. Here in central Washington winters we get a lot of transitions across 32-deg so frequently there's ice to deal with.

Blizzaks handle icy conditions pretty well, and we've been using them for years on other vehicles like my wife's all-wheel-drive sedan and our Ford Ranger 4x4. For those we have separate sets of wheels used for winter tires, as it's so much easier to make the twice-yearly switch.

For a TPMS equipped vehicle, it's apparently against federal law for a tire installer to omit the TPMS senders when installing tires, so there's the added expense of buying and installing a set of senders for your new wheels too.

We have not equipped the smart with winter tires and wheels, as it gets around town ok in moderate snow and ice if driven gently... yet I'm still a "nervous nellie" and don't take it further afield. :)
 
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