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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just saw this in the newspaper and thought Hmmmmm ...interesting.
I know there are some who are so in love with their electric car you'll swear your home electric bill went down the minute you plugged it into the outlet. To those folks I say great, I'm happy for you and you will have no interest in the article below.
Take Care.

NEW AAA STUDY: ELECTRIC CARS COST MORE PER YEAR THAN MIDSIZE GASOLINE CARS & CROSSOVERS
1 MONTH AGO • INDUSTRY NEWS, NEWS
Posted by John Goreham
The myth that electric vehicles have lower costs continues to be disproven.


The latest reality check for electric vehicle shoppers comes from AAA. The national office has completed a study comparing the annual cost of ownership for all types of 2017 vehicles. Among popular cars and crossovers, the study concludes that electric vehicles cost owners the most money each year to own and operate. The data in the study show that compared to the average small gasoline-powered sedan, the average EV will cost its owner about $21,000 more over a ten year period. Here’s why........

Please read the whole article. Link below
New AAA Study: Electric Cars Cost More Per Year Than Midsize Gasoline Cars & Crossovers | BestRide

'As we have covered in the past, the myth that EVs have dramatically lower maintenance costs is easy to disprove. Almost any comparison of EV maintenance costs done by EVangelists will use out-of-date terms like “tune-up” and include the cost of maintenance no longer done on modern cars, like power steering fluid changes. Modern automobiles that use only gasoline for power are very competitive to EVs in annual maintenance costs.'

Fuel Cost
'EV owners and advocates sometimes pretend electricity is nearly free, when in fact, many owners will find that their electric bill will double when they take home a new EV.

Depreciation
Some don't figure this into ownership costs, because it skews their thinking, but it is relevant for the majority of buyers/owners.

So, if EVs do have an edge in maintenance and annual costs for fuel, why are they so much more expensive to own than gasoline powered cars and crossovers? The main answer is the cost of the vehicle itself. Electric vehicles have the highest depreciation rates among all vehicles, and it is not even close. AAA explains, saying, “In 2017, small sedans ($2,114) and small SUVs ($2,840) have the lowest annual depreciation costs, while minivans ($3,839) and electric vehicles ($5,704) are at the high end of the scale.” High depreciation of EVs is due to a number of factors. Ironically, taxpayer-funded rebates are the largest. Who wants to buy a used EV when a new one can come with up to $10,000 in incentives from state and federal governments? Another “problem” for EVs has been advancements in range. A new Chevy Bolt has nearly triple the range of a BMW i3 BEV from just a couple years ago, and double the range of the current Nissan Leaf. That hurts the resale value of used EVs with shorter range.......

EV Future Costs

EV model choices have exploded. In 2017 Inside EVs lists 38 electric vehicles and 14 battery-electric models on sale in calendar 2017. Electric vehicles hold much promise, have declining costs, and in the future will make up a much larger percentage of the U.S. vehicle fleet than they now do. However, to go mainstream, electric vehicles need to have mainstream costs of ownership, and the reality is, they have some ground to make up.
 

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MY08 cabrio MY09 cabrio Brabus MY15 ED
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Just saw this in the newspaper and thought Hmmmmm ...interesting.
Fuel Cost
'EV owners and advocates sometimes pretend electricity is nearly free, when in fact, many owners will find that their electric bill will double when they take home a new EV.
Umm, FACT CHECK? :bullsht:

This is more unsubstantiated "news" being attributed to a "reliable source" AAA when in fact it is at a rehash of a rehash of the original AAA study?

Here is the original source of The Study.

Your Driving Costs | AAA NewsRoom

And I find NOTHING wherein AAA says that electric bills doubled?

"Electric Vehicles
New to the Your Driving Costs study in 2017, AAA found that electric vehicles have lower-than-average driving costs at $8,439 per year. Without a gasoline engine to maintain, electric vehicles have the lowest annual maintenance and repair costs, at $982 per year. By relying on electricity instead of gasoline, fuel costs are also significantly lower than average, at under four cents per mile. Depreciation, however, is currently extremely high for these vehicles, losing an average of nearly $6,000 in value every year."

Just another gent with a keyboard, computer and opinion posting SENSATIONAL HEADLINES to earn a little "click bait" money . . . :shrug:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If resale value is your purpose for buying a vehicle, then you must not like it very much to already plan on ditching it... or nah? :shrug:
Hook them with emotion don't let facts get in the way.
Do you dispute that resale is part of the cost of ownership? Because if that is your logic the the price of the car shouldn't be considered either.
 

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Hook them with emotion don't let facts get in the way.
Do you dispute that resale is part of the cost of ownership? Because if that is your logic the the price of the car shouldn't be considered either.
I have a long explanation and response to that, and I'd rather not drag my thoughts out endlessly. Resale value matters under the criteria of the mainstream. I rank other aspects of vehicle performance and design above resale value.

My point was valid. If I had a plan to ditch the car in 3 years, or 5 years, I probably wouldn't buy it to begin with. I would probably consider leasing it to save the trouble and minimize my risks.
 

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We've owned 2 Honda Fits now. According to Intelligent Choice. The Honda Fit, holds 56% of resale value, after 5 years of ownership. I doulbt the old Honda Fit EV carries those number.

The fact is. You don't buy the average vehicle for a investment. Unless maybe, it's a Ford GT 40, Ferrari, AMG exotic MB etc.

EV's up front buying cost are $$$$$. Resale value is poor compared to their ICE counterparts. Leasing to me is like renting. Throwing money away. I usually now keep my cars now for 7-10 years. Can you wave the up front cost of a EV, and the limited driving range. Compared to a ICE vehicle. Too me buying a used EV, makes more sense. Then new. Low cost energy, and a vehicle for $6-8k. Win win.

EV's are here to stay. Range is increasing, the price of them are dropping.
 

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Or buy used for cheap like I did. As for maintenance, the smart EV needs a $50 battery filter, a $20 cabin filter, and a brake fluid flush every two years. Just the cost of oil changes im an ICE alone in 2 years costs well more than that , not to mention the ICE will also need a brake fluid flush. As for electricity, I'm paying 17cents per kilowatt and getting almost 4 miles per kwh. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to do some basic math. The car costs me less than 5 cents per mile to operate. It's a 2014 with 16,000 miles on the odo and I purchased it for $6200. You couldn't find a Honda fit with 100,000 miles on it for that price.
 

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He said the EV DOES need a brake fluid flush like the ICE version.

Len
2014 EV Coupe 12,600 miles
2014 EV Cabriolet 1,900 miles
 

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Why will your EV not need a brake fluid flush like the ICE?
I said it does take a flush, but so does the ICE (along with the cabin filter). I guess my writing style isn't the best. My point was that the battery filter is the only thing different that the ICE version doesn't take. But the ICE will need much more that a $50 filter every 2 years. Oil changes alone will be over $100 each year. And then you still need to factor in trans flushes and spark plugs etc. Also, the brakes themselves will need to replaced less often on an ED because much of your slowing is done by regen. Theres no way the maintenance on an ED is more than an ICE.
 

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I've only had my 2015 ED for six months, but here's what I've found: My electric bill DID go up. About $30/month, or roughly $1 per day.

On the other hand, the last time I fueled up my ICE (at $30 per fillup) was in August. I was filling it up weekly.
 

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EVs are dirt cheap to get into. If I weren’t falling head first into a smart camper project I’d probably get a secondhand ED for work commuter car. The less maintenance sounds attractive and I’d never go farther than the range.

Plus you know, it’s basically my mission to own every conceivable type of smart ever.
 
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I think the idea of EV's are very attractive. However, the biggest hang up for me isn't the resale value or even the range. It's the fact that I can't charge it up in five minutes and be on my way like I can gas up in an ICE. Any cost difference between the two is worth the price I pay for the convenience of being able to come and go as I please and not worry about waiting for my vehicle to charge. Just my two cents.
 

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I think the idea of EV's are very attractive. However, the biggest hang up for me isn't the resale value or even the range. It's the fact that I can't charge it up in five minutes and be on my way like I can gas up in an ICE. Any cost difference between the two is worth the price I pay for the convenience of being able to come and go as I please and not worry about waiting for my vehicle to charge. Just my two cents.
Going to the gas station is a PITA. It's time consuming, there are frequently lines, and it smells of toxic chemicals. Plus it is shockingly expensive compared to an EV.

Driving an ED you get home, get out, plug it in, done. Never a worry, and so much more pleasant and convenient.

It's all a matter of experience.
 

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Driving an ED you get home, get out, plug it in, done. Never a worry, and so much more pleasant and convenient.

It's all a matter of experience.

This of course only holds true if you can do all the driving you need between charges within the range of the EV (which over time & weather will change). If you can great if not :shrug:
 
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