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Discussion Starter #1
So, I'm charging my Smart ED via a 25 ft 12 AWG extension cable (120V) from the driveway all the way to the back of the garage.

The plug in the outlet is straight and every once in a while it falls out of the outlet. One of these days this is gonna happen in the middle of the night and I won't have a full charge in the morning.

I have looked far and wide for a stub extension cable (12 AWG) that has a flat plug, so that it doesn't droop down from the outlet and eventually fall out. Yet, I can't find one. I only need about a foot long extension cable.

Does anyone know where I can find one at a reasonable price? Must be at least 12 AWG. I've looked for AC unit extension cables, but they are mostly 14 AWG. Are there other ways of fastening a straight plug in an outlet?
 

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If your cord is falling out of the receptacle, you need a new receptacle not another set of connections on a pigtail!
A higher quality outlet will do the trick. Hospital grade outlets have excellent tension to grip the blades and pin of a three wire plug.
Shy of a Hospital grade receptacle, a commercial or heavy duty outlet should have better plug pin tension or grip. Receptacle tension testors exist to certify outlet performance in hospitals.
Most any electrical supply would have access to hospital grade receptacles. Nothing will fall out of a Hospital grade outlet. Nothing. Some of the plugs and cables on hospital equipment are monsters.
They are never flat or angled plugs either, more like a handle to grip easily to insert and remove from an outlet.
I was a Bio-Med tech for a clinical engineering firm. We performed electrical safety inspections in O.R. and intensive care and coronary care units. I have tested outlet tension on more outlets than I care to remember. A hospital grade outlet will solve your problem and eliminate the poor electrical connection that presently exists that could pose a fire hazard in the receptacle itself.
 

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You could twist them a bit, but you still have a defective outlet. Why risk a fire or at the least a melted plug, or uncharged car when you really need it. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If your cord is falling out of the receptacle, you need a new receptacle not another set of connections on a pigtail!
A higher quality outlet will do the trick. Hospital grade outlets have excellent tension to grip the blades and pin of a three wire plug.
Wow. Really? That's my problem? The receptacle is to blame?

How I long for German receptacles now. Nothing falls out of those. The plug is supported by the outlet. Any outlet.

Sorry to say, but one more indicator that the US is an underdeveloped country.
 

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I'm with BB Benz. If the plug is loose in the outlet, the contact from outlet to plug is not good and contact resistance is higher. It also might cause arcing. This will heat the plug more and can lead to it melting or even starting a fire. That is the main problem here! The problem is not the plug falling out, that's just a symptom.

Replace the outlet! The majority of house fires are electrical fires, and this is how they start!

There is no reason not to use an angled plug extension in the new outlet, thoug, if you find one. I have a couple gray 12 Gauuge extensions that were labeled "for air conditioners" that have angled plugs. They're only 3m long, though. I use them indoors for space heaters in cold winters. They are from Home Depot.
 

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Sorry to say, but one more indicator that the US is an underdeveloped country.
Don't think it's a US problem. It's likely a bent spring contact in the outlet, this can happen to a Schuko, too. You just wouldn't notice it from the plug falling out, only if you paid attention to the friction plugging or unplugging.

There are pros and cons to both Schuko and NEMA 5-15R, I prefer Schuko, too, but we're both biased:)
 

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The reason I mentioned Hospital Grade receptacles, is that they are engineered to make positive contact with the plug pins for the life of the receptacle. This is just the ticket for the kind of duty a car charger outlet performs. It is made to perform a high current connection for the long term rugged environment of a critical nature in a safe and reliable manner.
How do you know a receptacle is engineered as Hospital Grade? It has a bright green dot on the face of one of the duplex outlets that stick through the face plate.
Yes, they cost more than the $1.15 outlet available at the local home center. You get what you pay for. Presently the existing outlet is the weakest link between the breaker in the electrical panel and the charger for a rather expensive conveyance that is depended upon daily.
Upgrade the outlet, and protect not only your life, but two of your most expensive assets; your house and your car.
If the outlet is upgraded to a high quality version, there is no need for the angled plug or adding another potentially inexpensive extension cord connection. There is a reason that heaters should not be plugged into an extension cord. It applies to high current demand chargers as well.

Ideally a car charger outlet should be a dedicated line outlet with nothing else on the circuit just like a washing machine outlet is a single rather than a duplex receptacle with its' own dedicated breaker.
Someone in Florida left their Smart car plugged into a cheap charger while they went back home up north. Imagine their delight upon receiving that phone call regarding the status of their now empty lot in Florida. Smokin! :D
 

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Have the plug and receptacle changed to a "Twist Lock" type. Iv'e put them on all my outdoor electric yard tools and cords. You won't have that plug fall out again.
 
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