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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My newly acquired 2008, 451, 999cc + turbo, has a 42 kWh battery - I assume the car's system draws some current even when the 451 is not in use, so bearing in mind I won't use it much in the winter, how long should a charged battery last before being unable to start the engine ? :|

And if I charge it still in the car, because it seems real difficult to get out of its location under the seat area, should I disconnect one of the leads ? Most chargers put out about 14.5 volts, so is that likely to cause any problems with the car's electronics if I don't disconnect at least the negative car lead from its battery terminal. And I've seen boost batteries which plug into the cigarette-lighter socket/auxiliary power outlet - is that another way to do a battery charge ?


Dan.
 

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I use solar charging panels in the cars that sit for some time. Yes the smart will draw some power while sitting so over time it will deplete. Not sure what time frame that is though but suspect it will depend a lot on the condition of the battery and outside temperature. There are trickle charger/battery maintainers that you can buy as well. I use these on our garaged cars. Basically attach a lead to the battery terminals and in the case of the smart run it through the firewall to somewhere under the front panel. That end would have a plug that the charger then plugs into.

With the solar panel it sits on the dash however it has to be wired directly to the battery and is just unplugged and stashed behind the seat when not in use.
 

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charging the battery in the car is not an issue. Most chargers put out around 13 volts , the mart driving down the road runs at about 14 volts. disconnecting the neg terminal will keep the battery charge up longer since there won't be anything drawing it down. A trickle charger, or a battery maintainer is the best way to go for long storage of say over the winter months.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
@ SuperSmartie Re: "WOW! That's more than twice the size of the HV battery in the ED"

Sorry - misread in the cramped conditions while trying to hold a stiff obstinate carpet out of the way, so as to see the battery. It says actually 42Ah, NOT 42 kWh !

Having the battery where it is, is a real pain, so I've modified the front (UK 451 car) left-hand passenger carpet by making this section wholly detachable - so now I can remove this carpet section as well as the polystyrene foot-well piece. But I'm having trouble moving the center consol section holding the OBD plug and cigarette/power outlet to extract a 5 year old battery.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
charging the battery in the car is not an issue. Most chargers put out around 13 volts , the mart driving down the road runs at about 14 volts. disconnecting the neg terminal will keep the battery charge up longer since there won't be anything drawing it down. A trickle charger, or a battery maintainer is the best way to go for long storage of say over the winter months.
Can I use the aux. power outlet (formerly known as a cigarette light socket) in the cabin to input from a trickle charger ? This to save excavating the LHS carpet and polystyrene foot rest to get charging leads to the battery ?
 

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The charging port runs through the key switch and is not active with the switch off. Also that is monitored by the Can-Bus so any extra voltage on there will trigger a Check Engine Light (CEL)

Most owners that regularly use a maintainer or trickle charger connect wires to the battery and run them out either under the front service flap, or tie them up under the glove box and plug in to the charger when needed. Make sure the vent tube from the battery to the outside of the car is in good shape if you don't plan on removing the battery or pulling up the carpet for charging.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Most owners that regularly use a maintainer or trickle charger connect wires to the battery and run them out either under the front service flap, or tie them up under the glove box and plug in to the charger when needed. Make sure the vent tube from the battery to the outside of the car is in good shape if you don't plan on removing the battery or pulling up the carpet for charging.
Apologies for further questions, I'm real new to this car ! --

1) Where is the front service flap ?

2) Can I use a "sealed" battery, not needing venting, in a Smart 451 ?
 

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We were all new at one point...

Front service flap is also known on older cars as the hood. Owners manual refers to it as the 'Front service flap' You do want to make sure it is closed properly, make sure the 2 rear corners are flush with the fenders. There is a tab (on each side) that has to go under the fender edge. If it isn't tucked under, the 'flap' will blow off and damage the latches. Also the front should be held down securely. If there is any play the latches need to be replaced. (a common problem)

A sealed Battery is designed to not need venting. Those are usually classified as AGM or Gel Cells. any wet cell or batteries with water and acid can still be called a sealed battery but they do have a vent to let out gasses when they are being charged. Not a problem on cars with the battery up front where the bottom of the compartment is open. On a smart, with the battery in the passenger compartment, you would need to have it vented to the outside of the car.
 

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I added another cigarette lighter, mounted inside the storage to the left of the steering wheel. It's wired "hot" all the time, meaning that it's connected to the battery. I cut the alligator clip leads off a battery maintaining float charger and replaced them with a 12VDC plug. When my car is put in storage, I plug the float charger into the added socket, "backfeeding" a trickle charge into the battery. It's super easy to connect, doesn't require me to remove the passenger compartment carpeting and battery cover and works very well.
 

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I added another cigarette lighter, mounted inside the storage to the left of the steering wheel. It's wired "hot" all the time, meaning that it's connected to the battery. I cut the alligator clip leads off a battery maintaining float charger and replaced them with a 12VDC plug. When my car is put in storage, I plug the float charger into the added socket, "backfeeding" a trickle charge into the battery. It's super easy to connect, doesn't require me to remove the passenger compartment carpeting and battery cover and works very well.
So glad this subject came up now. Mine will only be driven once or twice a week--especially in winter. I want to add a trickle charger to a "constant on" 12v cigarette lighter socket, and I came across this:

http://www.smartcarofamerica.com/forums/f361/additional-12v-socket-updated-7255/

Since that's from 2008, I decided to continue on where @cubefx left off here. I hope this will "back feed" a trickle charge into the battery. Any thoughts? Going via the fuse box, will this "back feed" as I hope?
 
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