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Having had my 2015 smart ED for about three months now, I feel that I've gotten a pretty good handle on drive radius, performance, handling, charging options, etc. In other words, I'm not exploring the vehicle any more, but putting it to use as a daily driver and for the most part, using it as my primary vehicle.

I've also been watching my electric bill and, while I think it's still too early to tell, the increased charge is hardly going to break the bank. Meaning: I don't have a problem plugging it in every night if I have to (I don't).

So...

Today I threw caution (and economy) out the window and wondered what kind of eco ratings I would get if I drove the car more like a little sports car rather than an energy-saving econobox. I drove home in afternoon rush hour, and took full advantage of the instant torque and respectable 0-30 acceleration of the car, and really enjoyed keeping up with traffic (oh sure, there was occasional Yukon or Lincoln Townhouse that couldn't stand having a little car in front of them, and had to make sure they could get in front, but that's okay, I accept it).

At one point I glanced at the ECO gauge and it was registering 14%. That's the lowest I think I've ever seen it. Yet I still seemed to get the same mileage -- approximately -- as I do when I'm being a little old lady.

What's the lowest ECO rating you've ever seen? And what was your reaction when you saw it?
 

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While I don't own a smart, my Leaf is the same way. Hard acceleration barely registers on the range hit--much less than if I end up driving on windy days, or during less warm parts of the day. Regen braking will still factor in a decent amount in the city, though.

I think you really need a performance-oriented motor for hard acceleration to hit efficiency hard. The motor in this thing is geared toward max range, the solid performance is just a side effect of how superior EV tech is for off the line launching.
 

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I've seen an eco rating of 5%, and there are quite a few times when I'm there. Typically though, when I'm treating the throttle as an on-off switch, when the road clears I'm bumping up against the speed limiter so my range is pretty poor that charge as well.

The highest I saw was when I drove on the freeway to my daughter's place, then on the freeway to my work, then on the freeway to home. It was about 50 miles all together and at a steady real 65 MPH (indicated 70 MPH), and the eco was something like 96%.

So I think the motor is about 80% efficient, and is probably roughly the same or maybe a bit worse efficiency in regen. Keeping the speed constant should be more efficient.
 

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I think you really need a performance-oriented motor for hard acceleration to hit efficiency hard. The motor in this thing is geared toward max range, the solid performance is just a side effect of how superior EV tech is for off the line launching.
My understanding is that electric motors are a pretty mature technology and pretty much all of the efficiency is squeezed out of them. In the case of the Smart, acceleration is limited by current input to the motor, and the current input is limited in large part by the size of the battery pack. To a lithium based battery, a 5C discharge rate is basically like a short circuit and can be damaging to the battery in a very short time. The Smart ED seems to limit discharge rates to about 3.25C in that two minute mode, which is pretty conservative and is probably one of the contributors to the minimal degradation as compared to other electric vehicles.
 

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I think it starts out at 50%. I don't think I have ever gone below that. I shoot for the 80's and 90's. Have seen 100% a few times, upper 90's lots.

Len
2014 EV Coupe 11,900 miles
2014 EV Cabriolet 900 miles
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think it starts out at 50%. I don't think I have ever gone below that. I shoot for the 80's and 90's. Have seen 100% a few times, upper 90's lots.
My understanding is that the ECO (and the START) display resets after four hours of inactivity.

Still, I conclude that the ECO reading is largely a "feel good" display. My Mercedes has a similar display; I ignore it for the most part.

I drove to work this morning, largely ignoring the ECO readout. I arrived using pretty much the same power as I do when I try to keep it in the 70-80+ range. The ECO readout upon arrival was 58%.

I'm okay with that.
 

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I usually ignore the ECO meter, too. When I do look at it, it usually reads in the 70s. Looking at the app, that's near 100 for Stady Driving and Braking.
For Acceleration I get near zero >:D
 
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