Smart Car of America Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Averaged out the cost of hydro for the nightly recharge.
Plugging in at night with SOC being about 40%
This is in Ontario (Horizon Utilities) with a smart meter on our incoming hydro, so we can take advantage of time of use rates, with 7pm until 7am being the lowest, 7.7cents per kWh plus fees (delivery, network charge, storage, debt retirement fee from the former Ontario Hydro)
With all fees, our average is $39 per month to operate the ED. Averaging 30 days per month, that is $1.30 per day round trip. Since we are in the winter months, the battery efficiency is cut down, so we are essentially paying more since we are charging longer. Summer months will reduce our consumption and drop us below $1.30 per day.
While it does not seem like a lot of money, its $474 per year to operate the vehicle before we take into consideration the increased range in summer, which reduces this number.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
That's what I tell people, it only cost about a buck a day to charge or $30/month, even in winter months. What's not to like, even with gas prices plummeting, I prefer the smooth electric drive and passing all those gas stations is priceless, not to mention my dependance on oil is much reduced for most of my transportation needs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Grid Tie

That's what I tell people, it only cost about a buck a day to charge or $30/month, even in winter months. What's not to like, even with gas prices plummeting, I prefer the smooth electric drive and passing all those gas stations is priceless, not to mention my dependance on oil is much reduced for most of my transportation needs.
Very true, and if you go with a small grid tie inverter system easily found on Amazon, you can effectively cancel out your overall consumption. Canadian solar sells some cheap panels, and a 1000 watt inverter ( no batteries needed), you just plug the inverter into an outlet and there you have it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Canadian solar sells some cheap panels, and a 1000 watt inverter ( no batteries needed), you just plug the inverter into an outlet and there you have it.
I used to design solar power electronics (Maximum Power Point Trackers or "MPPT" to be specifc). At that time (2 years ago) the NEC in the US did not allow inverters to be plugged into an outlet. They had to be hard-wired into the load center. I realize the rules are different in Canada. Just bringing this up for our US readers...
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top