Smart Car of America Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So heres my smart MPG before the scangauge: 34 city / 37 highway
and my smart MPG after installing the scangauge: 40 city / 50 highway

Honestly I bought the scangauge because I love gadgets and it looked cool, but I'm amazed at how much I was able to learn from it. I don't even need to watch it anymore to get amazing mileage, I have just learned what my smart likes. I highly recommend it for anyone looking to get better MPGs, this thing will pay for itself. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
My 2 cents from my application - on a grade with your foot held still you can see the mpg drop and by quite a lot just to hold say 60 mph. However easing off the pedal like there was a raw egg between your foot and the pedal will not drop the speed much (1-2mph) and the mpg really climbs. And on a long straight highway it is possible to play with your speed (depending on the traffic flow) so that you always try to reach the maximum mpg. Also for me it was easy to see that in manual I wasn't nearly as fast or smart as the computer to select the shift points, so now 100% auto. I also found when coasting to a stop that the gauge gives the 9999 as the computer shuts down the fuel supply and in the past there were times I bumped N to roll to a stop so that I didn't work the engine as hard, fuel flow kept up at idle vs. the fuel shut off by the ECU. I know, shouldn't bump N, but done it with stick shifts longer than many of you reading this have been alive. Now I am looking at sitting at a light. Fuel flow seems to drop lower by bumping N than staying in gear while not moving, but I'm still evaluating that, it eventually goes down in gear, but seems to take longer. Of course I could do like hybrids and shut it down. What is the result? Hard to bet a steak dinner on, but the mpg on mine has gone from 39 without to 44+ with, however I admit that the engine also has broken in and that improves mpg. Basically it makes you more aware of what precious fuel you are using, it doesn't do anything FOR you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
193 Posts
Gas Pump Strategies

So, my obvious question is: what works and what doesn't. How about sharing some of your mileage extending techniques with us? Thanks! :)
John, Besides all the hypermiling techniques and Russ' comments along with those that I hope evilbean42 posts, I came across these techniques that might also help us all at the pump. They've been around for a while, but I think they're worth repeating:

Only buy or fill up your car or truck in the early morning when the ground temperature is still cold. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground. The colder the ground the more dense the gasoline, when it gets warmer gasoline expands, so buying in the after- noon or in the evening....your gallon is not exactly a gallon.

When you're filling up do not squeeze the trigger of the nozzle to a fast mode. If you look you will see that the trigger has three (3)stages: low, middle, and high. In slow mode you should be pumping on low speed, thereby minimizing the vapors that are created while you are pumping. All hoses at the pump have a vapor return. If you are pumping on the fast rate, some other liquid that goes to your tank becomes vapor. Those vapors are being sucked up and back into the underground storage tank so you're getting less worth for your money.

One of the most important tips is to fill up when your gas tank is HALF FULL or HALF EMPTY. The reason for this is, the more gas you have in your tank the less air occupying its empty space. Gasoline evaporates faster than you can imagine. Gasoline storage tanks have an internal floating roof. This roof serves as zero clearance between the gas and the atmosphere, so it minimizes the evaporation.

Another reminder, if there is a gasoline truck pumping into the storage tanks when you stop to buy gas, DO NOT fill up - most likely the gasoline is being stirred up as the gas is being delivered, and you might pick up some dirt that normally settles on the bottom.

These days, every drop counts. :)
 

·
Senior Smartie
Joined
·
1,263 Posts
I respectfully disagree....

John, Besides all the hypermiling techniques and Russ' comments along with those that I hope evilbean42 posts, I came across these techniques that might also help us all at the pump. They've been around for a while, but I think they're worth repeating:

Only buy or fill up your car or truck in the early morning when the ground temperature is still cold. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground. The colder the ground the more dense the gasoline, when it gets warmer gasoline expands, so buying in the after- noon or in the evening....your gallon is not exactly a gallon.

When you're filling up do not squeeze the trigger of the nozzle to a fast mode. If you look you will see that the trigger has three (3)stages: low, middle, and high. In slow mode you should be pumping on low speed, thereby minimizing the vapors that are created while you are pumping. All hoses at the pump have a vapor return. If you are pumping on the fast rate, some other liquid that goes to your tank becomes vapor. Those vapors are being sucked up and back into the underground storage tank so you're getting less worth for your money.

One of the most important tips is to fill up when your gas tank is HALF FULL or HALF EMPTY. The reason for this is, the more gas you have in your tank the less air occupying its empty space. Gasoline evaporates faster than you can imagine. Gasoline storage tanks have an internal floating roof. This roof serves as zero clearance between the gas and the atmosphere, so it minimizes the evaporation.

Another reminder, if there is a gasoline truck pumping into the storage tanks when you stop to buy gas, DO NOT fill up - most likely the gasoline is being stirred up as the gas is being delivered, and you might pick up some dirt that normally settles on the bottom.

These days, every drop counts. :)
This statement is BS from someplace and it's been on here before. As quoted...

<<<<Only buy or fill up your car or truck in the early morning when the ground temperature is still cold. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground. The colder the ground the more dense the gasoline, when it gets warmer gasoline expands, so buying in the after- noon or in the evening....your gallon is not exactly a gallon.>>>

Fact: Ground temperatures do not fluctuate enough to say so from sun up to sun down....according to meteorologists and geologists, it stays at a constant 55-56 degrees all the time.

POint #2...

<<<<If you are pumping on the fast rate, some other liquid that goes to your tank becomes vapor. Those vapors are being sucked up and back into the underground storage tank so you're getting less worth for your money.>>>
What other liquid?? Some OF the liquid~~

What could possibly be sucking the vapors back into the tank when there is only one hose and its the one pumping positive pressure liquid INTO the tank??? No such thing on any pumps I've used in NY anyway....some kind of evaporative emissions device at the pump??? Please educate me on this one.
Sounds like a bit of *hooey* to me.

I do agree with the statement suggesting that fast fills will aerate the gasoline as it enters the tank and that air does take up some space but the one concerning the fillup from half a tank also sounds like hooey to me. The air gets expelled from the tank when the liquid displaces it, coming out around the fill nozzle to atmosphere.

These things CANNOT make that much of a difference in a 7-8 gal fillup...not 5-8 mpg worth, anyway. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
A search for Scangauge will reveal threads with several photos of different mounting solutions. :)
I'm sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. I am not interested in how it's mounted, but how it's installed. That is, where do you plug it in?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
698 Posts
I'm sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. I am not interested in how it's mounted, but how it's installed. That is, where do you plug it in?

Thanks.
It plugs into the OBD port which is right above the gas pedal. The OBD port (Onboard Diagnostics Port) is required by law on every car sold and is always easily accessible and close to the steering wheel, under the dash.

Use the Search function and you'll see the port shown in photos in the ScanGauge mounting and installation threads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
I'm sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. I am not interested in how it's mounted, but how it's installed. That is, where do you plug it in?

Thanks.
Look down towards the gas pedal, top right, you will see the port. Just open the door and plug it in. Easy to find. Or I you could say between the steering wheel and the radio below the dash. Dang it just peek your head down there and you will find it! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Look down towards the gas pedal, top right, you will see the port. Just open the door and plug it in. Easy to find. Or I you could say between the steering wheel and the radio below the dash. Dang it just peek your head down there and you will find it! :)
Way too easy. :):) Thanks.

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
So heres my smart MPG before the scangauge: 34 city / 37 highway
and my smart MPG after installing the scangauge: 40 city / 50 highway

Honestly I bought the scangauge because I love gadgets and it looked cool, but I'm amazed at how much I was able to learn from it. I don't even need to watch it anymore to get amazing mileage, I have just learned what my smart likes. I highly recommend it for anyone looking to get better MPGs, this thing will pay for itself. :)
maybe we can do a group install/ mount of the scanguages in/at the first Long Island meet & greet? could be fun!! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
If you want it above the mirror here is the best cable for that.

If you are interested in mounting your SG above the mirror here is a great thin Ethernet cable to tuck behind everything. Sold by Cyberguys.com
10′ thin cable $4.45 - http://www.cyberguys.com/templates/SearchDetail.asp?productID=3584
You will also need a coupler to join the two cables. Part number: 180 0500 $0.85

Another member (Perscitus) told me about it. Cheap and it works great!
Here's a link to his install, http://www.smartcarofamerica.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1433&page=10&highlight=ScanGauge+Mount+Perscitus
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
Recognising that I know nothing about scanguages or auto electronics except what I have read here, it appears that the scanguage II is a simple plug and play installation by simply plugging it's cable into the OBD Port. And that the only other issue is where and how to mount it.

Am I correct about this?

Is this really an "anybody can do this installation?"

Thanks for putting up with an idiot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
Recognising that I know nothing about scanguages or auto electronics except what I have read here, it appears that the scanguage II is a simple plug and play installation by simply plugging it's cable into the OBD Port. And that the only other issue is where and how to mount it.

Am I correct about this?

Is this really an "anybody can do this installation?"

Thanks for putting up with an idiot!
Yes, it is that simple. Read the manual and find out how to put in your engine and tank size.

Idiots are the ones who don't ask questions.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Recognising that I know nothing about scanguages or auto electronics except what I have read here, it appears that the scanguage II is a simple plug and play installation by simply plugging it's cable into the OBD Port. And that the only other issue is where and how to mount it.

Am I correct about this?

Is this really an "anybody can do this installation?"

Thanks for putting up with an idiot!
Just go to the ScanGauge.com website and download the manual. You can read all about it before purchasing. Takes 30 seconds to install. Once you find your favorite mounting spot time will vary depending on complexity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
The Honda Insight has something like this build into the dash. Driving that car was like playing a video game. you do learn a lot about the car and how to get the optimal milage. I averaged 65 mpg, the few times my wife drove it she would get in the low 50's not because she's a lead foot, she just never figured out how to interpret the data.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,036 Posts
John, Besides all the hypermiling techniques and Russ' comments along with those that I hope evilbean42 posts, I came across these techniques that might also help us all at the pump. They've been around for a while, but I think they're worth repeating:

Only buy or fill up your car or truck in the early morning when the ground temperature is still cold. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground. The colder the ground the more dense the gasoline, when it gets warmer gasoline expands, so buying in the after- noon or in the evening....your gallon is not exactly a gallon.

When you're filling up do not squeeze the trigger of the nozzle to a fast mode. If you look you will see that the trigger has three (3)stages: low, middle, and high. In slow mode you should be pumping on low speed, thereby minimizing the vapors that are created while you are pumping. All hoses at the pump have a vapor return. If you are pumping on the fast rate, some other liquid that goes to your tank becomes vapor. Those vapors are being sucked up and back into the underground storage tank so you're getting less worth for your money.

One of the most important tips is to fill up when your gas tank is HALF FULL or HALF EMPTY. The reason for this is, the more gas you have in your tank the less air occupying its empty space. Gasoline evaporates faster than you can imagine. Gasoline storage tanks have an internal floating roof. This roof serves as zero clearance between the gas and the atmosphere, so it minimizes the evaporation.

Another reminder, if there is a gasoline truck pumping into the storage tanks when you stop to buy gas, DO NOT fill up - most likely the gasoline is being stirred up as the gas is being delivered, and you might pick up some dirt that normally settles on the bottom.

These days, every drop counts. :)
the temp in the ground stays at around 41 what remains in the pump above and its temp are the difference....
karl
temp does make a difference
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top