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Jeez, it is the same price as a Level 2 charger, seems like a huge waste of money.
How close is your electrical panel to the garage? If it is on the exterior garage wall, wiring is pretty simple to go 240v
 

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What does the charger manufacturer claim it will do on 120V? Normally the charger adjusts based on charging profiles programmed in. I'm the CFO and one of the owners of a large battery manufacturing company. Lead acid batteries only. We approve the various chargers for our batteries. All the charges we see are constantly adjusting amps based on what the charger sees the batteries doing. Having good input current is important and a 240 setup will always beat 120.

http://www.usbattery.com/usb_images/charging_instruction_2011_3.pdf
 

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But your landlord is getting an improvement to his or hers property or possibly a fire hazzard if someone like me does it. My company has been involved with numerous charger manufacturers and I will repeat 240 kicks 120's butt in charging speed!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm well aware. Also at work I have a 20amp plug by where I usually park and I've gotten permission.

I'll simply put a 20amp plug at the end of the pigtail and use 10/3 Generator cord to connect IF anyone knows that the smart will pull 16, instead of 12 from it.

I don't have an option for 240. I woulda if I coulda.

If I park for 8 hours for work @ 12amps = 1440 = 11,520 watts
8 hours @ 16 amps = 1920 = 15360 watts

Big enough difference to me with my long commute. I wouldn't have to go 55mph on the freeway with no heat, no stereo to be safe I can make it all the way home.

Can anyone answer the original question at hand?

P.s.: I love that I'm green and 100% electric, no doubt. But the REAL reason I leased it was for that shiny white carpool sticker.
 

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It should do 16A, as the clipper creek will tell the car that it has that much available. But there is only one way to find out for sure... You'll have to make the $500 sacrifice to science!
 

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I would expect the charge rate to be variable up to the charger's rated maximum, given adequate supply amperage, depending on the battery pack state of charge.
 

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For level 1 and level 2, the charger is in the car, not the "charging station". The "charging station" is a glorified extension cord with a special connector. The charging station presents a resistor to the charger in the car that indicates the maximum current it can handle. It is entirely up to the car as to whether it will pull 16 amps with the clipper creek unit. In theory, the charging cord that came with the car could be modified to supply 16 amps if the charger in the car would recognize it. I don't recommend hacking the smart charging cord. The convenience of leaving the smart cord in the car might be worth installing a permanent unit if you're not able to charge at 16 amps.
 

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The car will do 16 Amps charging. Provided you are using a level 1 charger that supports that. And that you are plugged into a circuit the supports 20 amps

In the car setting u have 3 options 8 12 and MAX. Car has to be on max to accept that.

Cuts the charging time

0-100 12amps 16h
0-100 16amps 13h

Alex
 

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I do not have 240 available, but I DO have a 20amp circuit available in my garage.

Clipper Creek makes the ACS-20, which advertises itself as a 20amp, 16amp continuous L1 Charger.

My question is; if I get this, will my 2013 Smart ED pull 16? Or the sluggish 12?

I looked into this very thing myself for precisely the same reason. Will Barrett at Clipper Creek responded as follows, "We do not have any plug in stations that would provide a higher level of power to your Smart ED at the 120V level. The ACS-20 is a hardwired satiation [sic] and it may or may not offer a quicker charge for your 2015 Smart ED. In our last round of testing vehicles were generally limited to 12A charging at 120V power. Even with our ACS-20 or 25 offering additional current available to the vehicle for charging, vehicles would max out right at the 12 Amp level when charging at 120V. The only vehicles that took advantage of the extra power were the Tesla Roadster and the Tesla Model S."


I gave up and installed a Schneider Electric EV Link EV230WS in my garage. Later on I stumbled upon the EVSE Upgrade website. The information on the EVSE Upgrade website isn't very clear, but it seems to imply that their units do take advantage of the additional current available from a 120V, 20A outlet. I'm not exactly sure how they do that, but it's possible these units have a 120 to 240V transformer.

I'm very curious to know what you find out!
 

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how do you get the max setting? My car only has 8A and 12A...
I did some reading in the 2015 ED owner's manual (page 91). It appears that one can set "Max" either by the button on the so-called "Charging Cable" (aka "EVSE") supplied with the car or by the multifunction display using the control lever to the right of the steering wheel. With the vehicle unlocked push in the button on the end of the control lever and go down until you can select the "Charge and Depart" menu. Then go down until the "Charge Current" menu is displayed. Press in the button on the end of the control stick. Go down until you see "Max" on the display. Press in the button to select it.

In this mode, the onboard charger should accept whatever current the external power supply (EVSE) can provide.

I'd love to know if you're able to get more than 12A out of your "charging cable".
 

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The car will do 16 Amps charging. Provided you are using a level 1 charger that supports that. And that you are plugged into a circuit the supports 20 amps
Are you using a car made for the US market? The manual says that the maximum charging current depends on the country. Here's what it says in the 2015 ED manual: "Depending on the country, the value of the maximum setting may vary".

What EVSE are you using to get 16A charging; the one supplied with the car or something else?
 

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ClipperCreek level 1 charger
Which one? The ACS-20? How do you know you're charging at 16A?

I would expect the limits for Canada and the US to be the same. I appreciate the information! Apparently, even Clipper Creek doesn't realize that you can get higher charging currents using their products.
 

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Correct the ACS-20 with a nema 5-15 on it so i can plug it in regular power outlets

When I plug in a killawatt it reads ~1800 watts on MAX and ~1350 watts on 12 amp settings, never tired the 8 amp
 

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I have a US based EV, and it has the three settings (8,12,MAX). I'd venture to bet that the max value is configurable, but probably was not updated for this release based on the market.

Most EV will take the highest current level offered by the EVSE unless told to do otherwise. The EVSE broadcasts it's max limit, and the car's charger is supposed to draw accordingly. In the case of the smart, the upper limit for the on-board charger looks to be about 22A for 110, and 13.5A for 220. In theory the 110 should be able to handle 27A (3.3KW) but I'm betting the charger can't quite handle that much as raw 110. I'd also bet they cap it at ~20A for 110 to stay below component limits.

At 1800W, you're talking about 16.3A, which is already above what most US lines can handle. Most US houses (post 1960) are rated (and breaker-ed) at 15A, with only a few new homes (post 2005) usually moving up to 20A circuits. It wouldn't surprise me if the Leaf and others limit current in the US to 14A to prevent blowing circuit breakers on misconfigured EVSE.
 
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