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Discussion Starter #1
A few months ago I bought a ED. I wanted faster charge times at home, but all the level 2 chargers seemed too expensive. I built this one for under $200, and it works well on my Smart ED. After driving 60 miles, it takes 4 hours to recharge. I looked at other projects online, and found they were too complicated and the code did not compile. My design notes and code are attached. If you try to build it and have any questions, feel free to contact me. :)
 

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Check with your home insurance company and find out what they will require to have it certified and approved. Getting it inspected by a qualified electrician and issuing a certificate or similar, might be all you need to meet the company's needs.
 

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Congrats on your home-built EVSE!
(The charger is in the car, you built an "EV Supply Equipment" that connects it to the grid.)

I set the Arduino code for a 20% duty cycle that corresponds to 12 AMPS the maximum charging current of the ED. (I actually measured 14.7 A
This is odd! 20% should indeed tell the charger in the car to draw no more than 12A. Note that the smart charger is capable of up to 16A, not 12 as you suggested. However, it should be following protocol and only take as much as allowed!

Since you seem to be technically inclined, and you have an EVSE you can manipulate at will, it might be interesting to record a curve of actual current draw over J1772 signalling to find out how well or badly the car behaves. Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Feedback

Let me see, lots of interesting comments.
Yes, I am a EE.
No, to the best of my knowledge there is no requirement for certification or inspection for the charger in my juristiction, maybe Canada is different.
Thanks for the info on the 16A limit on charging current. Somewhere I read 12A. Since the cable I bought is 15A rated though, I won't try increasing the current, though I might have done it differently had I known ahead of time.
I did see the battery Arduino project, and might try to replicate it later. It can come in handy as the battery ages, since problems can occur, and I did not purchase the lease. However, I have 2 years left on the warranty, so I need to build it by then.
 

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No, to the best of my knowledge there is no requirement for certification or inspection for the charger in my juristiction, maybe Canada is different.


I would advise you to call your company and let them know you have installed your system. They may be content with knowing it's there or they might ask for an outside firm/agency inspect it.

Why the hassle? If ever you have a fire that could be attributed to your installation, your insurance will be denied. Is that reason enough?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Actually it is not correct. First of all, the installation is plug in, not hard wired. In addition, they cannot not pay out on the insurance, they can however not renew the policy. There is no language in the policy that requires me to notify the insurance company, nor is there a code regulation requiring it. Why would I bother?
 

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Aha, sounds like there isn't a problem after all. I had envisioned it, !Ike most stations, hard wired, but since yours isn't , no problem. My apologies.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
No problem. In fact, many municipalities require inspection for electrical wiring. but not all.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I see where I got the 12A from, the owners manual:
The following values are available for
selection: 8 A, 10 A, 12 A, Max. The last value
set remains stored until a change is made.


No mention here of 16A, where did you get that information?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
No, not reinventing, simplifying. If you look at what I did, and what they did, mine is much simpler and less expensive. In my opinion, what they did was too complicated, and the code that they provided would not compile. They probably were using a different version of Arduino, I did not see it specified which build they used.
 
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