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Discussion Starter #1
Back in May I bought some LED license plate lights from eBay. They went an entire month before the LED on the left side blew out (and took the fuse with it) while I was in Iowa.

I then replaced the fuse, tossed out the other LED, and bought two brand new Sylvania ones from AutoZone.

The LED in the left side is fine, but the one in the right doesn't even last a full two days before going out.

I got AutoZone to exchange the burned out LED two times already and every single time the right side of the car eats the LED.

What's going wrong here? Is the right side license plate light getting more volts? Should I pick up LEDs with boards inside???
 

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I'm going to go with quality.... honestly it was 2-3 sets before I found some on ebay that wouldn't burn out.... once I found a set that was 6 years ago. Just don't go too cheap on ebay.... LED's appear to definitely be you get what you pay for.


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Right, well then. I'll go ahead and try to get a refund on the AutoZone ones. The eBay ones lasted longer and they were cheaper!!!

At least my LED parking lights are still working flawlessly (knock on wood). I wish to never change those darn things ever again! :D
 

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The only bulbs that I have changed in 7 years are the brake light bulbs on our 450. The left one went last year and the right one just this week. They are conventional filament bulbs and fairly easy to change, once you figure out how to get the assembly apart. The bulbs are also very inexpensive and avialable everywhere; even the automotive aisle of our local Soriana grocery store.
 

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A good LED should have a life of 25,000 ---> 100,000 hours. However even a good LED will die an early death if too much current is fed to it. In most cases, we use a current limiting resistor to protect the LED.

My guess is that someone is NOT using a current limiting resistor and trying to just have the voltage drop across the LEDs as the limit to the current. It can work, BUT one voltage spike and your LEDs consume way too much current. The fact that a fuse blew suggests that there's no current limiting resistor.

It sounds like a badly made product.


Bob Diaz
 

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