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King of Smart Gadgetry
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Discussion Starter #1
As I was installing my new HID 5000K lights I discovered that my passenger side headlight assembly had an adjuster broken and the projector assembly just flopped up and down on it's axis.

The projector assembly is supported in a plastic "C" shaped arm. The projector pivots on 2 points and the third point is the bottom adjuster. The whole "C" assembly is made out of plastic and seems to be fragile.

Both adjuster assemblies that you adjust from the top is complicated and moves the whole "C" assembly on the projector. One adjuster raises or lowers both low & high beam whereas the other top adjuster only affects the high beam.

The adjuster that I had broken is the lower one in the back that protrudes from the headlight assembly. It is made of metal and uses a very small pentagon shaped socket to move it. It moves the low beam projector to the left or right by connecting as the third point of attachment for the "C" arm. The metal shaft has a plastic threaded cap on it in the inside of the light assembly and the plastic threaded cap is attached to the "C" arm. I thought about just super glueing the broken part back together, but since it is hard to get to I decided to use Gorilla glue 2 part epoxy to give me more time to align the parts and not stick my finger together like super glue can do.

So I headed to Lowes and got the epoxy. I headed home and mixed a batch and glued the parts together. Well there's a warning on the epoxy that says do NOT use this on polyprolene plastic and guess what the adjuster is made from? Well I ended up melting the adjusters end cap on it's metal shaft.




So I knew I had to make a new adjuster or pay $112 to $230 for a new headlight assembly. I took a threaded rod and a cap nut from an old trophy that I had.




And I got out my long drill bit.




And I marked a spot on the "C" right above where the original adjuster was located. That spot has a clear shot to the rear of the case. So here is where I drilled through the "C" and straight on through the back of the case. Be careful of the wires coming from the power connector for the headlight assembly, so the drill bit doesn't get tangled in them and break them.




Then I super glued the cap nut to the rear of the headlight assembly.




After the cap nut dried for a few minutes I threaded the rod from the back side into the interior of the assembly. Right before the rod reached the "c" I threaded a nut and then a washer facing the "c". Then I threaded the rod on through the "c" and placed a nut and a washer on the end and super glued the nuts in place in a position that they still allowed enough slack for the threaded rod to spin.




Then I cut off the other end of the threaded rod, leaving a little bit. Then I threaded on a jam nut and lastly a wing nut. I jammed the wing and nut together with a dose of super glue on the threads to keep them from loosening.




When I finally got the HID lights done, I turned them on and Max's jaw dropped because they were so BRIGHT.



The low beam HID's have a nice blue tint to them and the H7 high beams seem more yellow. For some reason the camera doesn't seem to pick up the differences which are striking. They are so much brighter than the H7's. It is almost unbelievable the difference. Now I just have to adjust them down a little and I'll also double check my left/right adjustment on the passenger side one. DCO
 

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Great job fixing the adjuster! The instructions will come in handy some day...

If the lights are brighter from the viewpoint of the camera, that's glare to oncoming drivers. Are you sure you got the proper HID emitters for our projection lenses? They shouldn't throw that much light up in the air, but onto the road with a sharp cutoff.
 

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King of Smart Gadgetry
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Discussion Starter #3
The picture from my digital camera is misleading. The light shines down well and isn't a blaring glare as the picture shows. I have adjustments to check to be sure that they aren't too high. But it is very noticable to the naked eye that the xenon's have a slight blue tint and the high beam halogens look yellowish. I researched the HID's and 3000K was yellowish as in fog lamps. 5000K was supposed to be the brightest white light you could get so that's what I got. Then from 6000K up thhey were supposed to be more blue toned which is supposed to fatigue your eyes more, and I didn't want that. But even though my lows look slightly blue the camera doesn't pick that up with my automatic settings so they appear to be just out of control blinding and glaring , but they aren't. DCO
 

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The picture from my digital camera is misleading. The light shines down well and isn't a blaring glare as the picture shows. I have adjustments to check to be sure that they aren't too high. But it is very noticable to the naked eye that the xenon's have a slight blue tint and the high beam halogens look yellowish. I researched the HID's and 3000K was yellowish as in fog lamps. 5000K was supposed to be the brightest white light you could get so that's what I got. Then from 6000K up thhey were supposed to be more blue toned which is supposed to fatigue your eyes more, and I didn't want that. But even though my lows look slightly blue the camera doesn't pick that up with my automatic settings so they appear to be just out of control blinding and glaring , but they aren't. DCO
Agreed. In the picture the high beams are on, and it "seems" like that is where the glare is coming from. Nice work!!!

I'm afraid to be pulled over here in CA, although I am tempted to get the SmartMadness upgrade for stealth in case I am. So far the halogens have been bright enough for my night blindness, so I am living with them so to speak...
 
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