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Discussion Starter #1
Here's the story...

During the unusually warm weather in May, my wife reported the A/C not working upon its first use of the season. This is the second year that this has happened - the last time, the dealer reported that it was due to a bad condenser temperature sensor in the air box with a connector that may have been broken by the service person - so it was replaced too. So when it failed again this year, I checked the sensor (about 2K ohm at about 25C - going down when warmed in the fingers) and found it and found a 5V signal to it.

So, I took it to my local MB dealer on June 4. They said it was reported a bad compressor and so thy replaced it (remanufactured), the air dryer, and of course the refrigerant and the service ticket said it was "operating normally". I tested it on the way out from the service area and found it was not working - but the temperature was only 60F that day and I thought that it was just too cool for turn on. But in warmer weather a few days later, I confirmed that it didn't work.

On June 11 I took it back. Yesterday they said that they believed that the remanufactured compressor was bad and would have it ready today. But today I called then and they said that the problem was an "expensive wire" that cost $960 and had to be ordered from California. I tried to press the service rep as to what this "wire" was and he just said that it was a high voltage wire of some kind - and that the service tech are really getting ticked off at these electric Smarts. He said he might have it ready tomorrow.

I am really starting to worry about whether that know what they are doing. What "wire" could cost $960? And why should simply servicing the A/C blow up into such an expensive and complicated problem?

I'll send an update tomorrow....
 

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I tried to find such a "wire" in the EPC with no luck. If your repair ticket shows a part number, share that with us and I should be able to find it on the blow ups. The good news is that it's not coming out of your pocket.

Len
2014 EV Coupe 15,500 miles
2014 EV Cabriolet 5,500 miles
 

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The Mercedes gods must have read up on this forum that you got a great deal on one of their vehicles, and are trying to strike back at you, but forgot about their warranty obligations...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I tried to find such a "wire" in the EPC with no luck. If your repair ticket shows a part number, share that with us and I should be able to find it on the blow ups.


Speculating a bit, what the sales rep is probably talking about is the high voltage wiring harness/fuse/distribution plate assembly that is attached to the side of the motor controller/inverter unit - the first thing you notice when you open the "engine cover". Each HV wire set exiting the plate is fused and if any fuse blows, the whole assembly/harness must be replaced. presumably, the bad compressor that was first replaced resulted in a HV short and blew the fuse. If this happens again one presumably could be bought used from a junkyard for vastly cheaper. For example, the ED compressor new (or factory refurbished?) costs about $900, but junkyards are selling them on Ebay for $25 to $75. It is probably be a good idea to line up the phone numbers of the few junkyards with ED's in them - presumably most of them are in California, maybe a few in NY or NJ.


And what is your source for looking up parts? A google search of "smart electric drive parts" turns up nothing relevant.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
OK, the problem was a LIN signal wire to the compressor broke due to the wire harness rubbing against a frame part. It was repaired (presumably spliced) and hopefully something was done (relocate the wire bundle) to prevent a recurrence. This calls into question whether the compressor was ever actually bad, but it is all warranty work, so whatever...

Then, during an inspection, the tech found the wiring from the charging receptacle to the charger to be "damaged" in an unspecified way (rubbing/pinching?). The charging receptacle/wiring cable was replaced. This was probably the expensive item - although $960 would be kind of outrageous for such a simple thing that a DIYer could build themselves with stuff from an internet EV parts source and a hardware store.

When I got the car home, I opened the engine compartment and found that the power/signal cable from the receptacle to the charger is not well secured and it rubs against the motor mount and a part of the frame. I zip-tied it, and the taillight harness bundle nearby which is also poorly secured, to the adjacent refrigerant lines to get them clear of rubbing against metal parts.

Wires wearing through after just 3 years are some awful basic defects - more like I'd expect in a car from China rather than Germany.
 

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Yinzer - Question - "When I got the car home, I opened the engine compartment"......how do you open the engine (motor?) compartment....are you talking about the front hood piece or in the rear under the carpet?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yinzer - Question - "When I got the car home, I opened the engine compartment"......how do you open the engine (motor?) compartment....are you talking about the front hood piece or in the rear under the carpet?
The rear compartment. The smart is a rear-engine car.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes, lift the carpet and attached foam padding up and forward. Turn the one obvious screw with a coin a 1/4 turn, and remove the steel cover panel. Note that the foam padding might develop a transverse split from folding the carpet/padding out of the way, but it does not affect anything. Remove the bolt/tie down and plastic snap-down on the left and right sides of the cargo area to reduce the chance of this happening.

Look here for an explanation of the components in the compartment. As you might already be aware - the EV standard is that bright orange sheaths denote high-voltage wires (which includes the 120/240V cable to the charger).

http://www.smartcarofamerica.com/forums/f170/introduction-service-smart-electric-149914/
 
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