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Can anyone direct me what to do to get this vehicle back to road?
I'm a bit of a "newbie" when it comes to the Smart ED, but like you I own a bricked Smart ED.

From what I've been able to surmise so far, some people have been able to revive a bricked battery but the process is somewhat lengthy/complex and also has a element of risk because you're dealing with high voltage that could potentially kill a person.

In answer to your question, I have not found a source for a reman battery. Some people have bought their battery from a wrecking yard and others have suggested buying a wrecked Smart ED from a company like Copart that auctions damaged vehicles.

Bottom line: If you're looking for a simple and cheap solution it doesn't appear there is one. How you proceed largely depends on how much effort and money you want to invest to revive your Smart ED. I think most people just give up because it's not economical to invest too much money in a car that only has a street value of about $5,000 - $6,000 when it fully operational.
 

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Bottom line: If you're looking for a simple and cheap solution it doesn't appear there is one. How you proceed largely depends on how much effort and money you want to invest to revive your Smart ED. I think most people just give up because it's not economical to invest too much money in a car that only has a street value of about $5,000 - $6,000 when it fully operational.
I'm sorry for your current predicament.
But there is great advice above.
Years past I have seen price quotes for smart eq batteries range anywhere from $2500 to over $12,000.00
Good luck to you.
 

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I found this page on a German enthusiast's website:

E18-1 BMS reset (P18051C)

I think if you read it closely, it's still very difficult to un-brick a battery, but perhaps this would be a starting point.

It might also be interesting to get a quote from the M-B dealer.

Charles.
 

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I'm a bit of a "newbie" when it comes to the Smart ED, but like you I own a bricked Smart ED.

From what I've been able to surmise so far, some people have been able to revive a bricked battery but the process is somewhat lengthy/complex and also has a element of risk because you're dealing with high voltage that could potentially kill a person.

In answer to your question, I have not found a source for a reman battery. Some people have bought their battery from a wrecking yard and others have suggested buying a wrecked Smart ED from a company like Copart that auctions damaged vehicles.

Bottom line: If you're looking for a simple and cheap solution it doesn't appear there is one. How you proceed largely depends on how much effort and money you want to invest to revive your Smart ED. I think most people just give up because it's not economical to invest too much money in a car that only has a street value of about $5,000 - $6,000 when it fully operational.
Where are you located?
 

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2014 Cabriolet bought in Sept 2016 with 6,470 mi
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MIKE SOCAL:

Assuming that you have already replaced the 12V battery to see if that will revive the car, my advice is sue MB for a replacement or refund either in small claims or regular civil court.

They have made a defective product and have offered no fix for it other than replace the traction battery with a refurb for $12,000+ if you can actually find one and a service center that can and will do the job.

Your other options are to pull the pack and attempt to revive it or get rid of the car for whatever you can get.
 

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Usually one or more cells go bad due to 'neglect' which in the case of the Smart_EV can be as simple as letting the 12v battery discharge over a period of a few to several months. Since the traction battery is a series of 93 Li-Ion cells if any one dies then the entire battery drops to zero volts. User repair is difficult since you cannot simply unbolt a cell and bolt in a replacement as you can with many EVs.

In other EVs this is not a problem since their design safely shuts off and protects the high voltage battery from damage. Unique to the industry, Daimler has allowed the Smart_EV3 (451) to self-destruct its own traction battery, blaming this on the owner for various reasons which have echoed around this forum. To protect your EV3 do not leave it unattended, have someone drive it every week etc. If you can't do this then you need to disconnect the 12v battery negative lead and hook a float charger to the 12v battery to keep it fresh. This will protect the traction battery for up to 2 months (so far), see my thread on this topic. This is a 'folk remedy' based on the simple logic that lacking a power source external to the traction battery (since you've gone and unhooked it) prevents the ED3 system from harming that big expensive traction battery. So far this has worked and there has been slight ~5% charge drop per month which is to be expected. In other words AN ED3 WITHOUT A 12 VOLT BATTERY CANNOT DESTROY ITS TRACTION BATTERY.
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