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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Autel MaxiAP AP200M, about $50 on Amazon. I have a 2013 electric Smart and this dongle really works, diagnoses and clears codes. Software downloading was a pain for me, lots of steps. But I persevered, followed instructions and was overjoyed when it actually worked.
 

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So what codes have you used the unit for to reset? Does it happen to reset the service due indicator? Does it read your 12v battery and HV battery data?

Len
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It definitely reads both the 12v and HV batteries. I did not have any errors displayed on my dash, so cannot totally say they would clear but I strongly suspect they would clear.

In the software (Bluetoothed to the dongle), I hit Diagnose and many, many tests run. It looks like it tests everything. It shows me a long list of passed/failed for each test. I can go into each fail, read the description, and press Clear if I want to clear out the fail.

It also let's me see all data in Live mode. For instance, if I press the accelerator, it will show me the percent depressed in real time.

I am taking my car in for air conditioner service, and I can see the faults in the system with this. I don't want to clear out those codes right now so the technicians can read them. Oh yes, it tells me my odometer reading first occurred and every time since then.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Let me clarify, it says "clear fault" not "clear fail."
Also, to help anyone else who wants to try this, here's why installing the software was finicky for me:
I'm using an older android phone with 12GB of internal memory and a 64GB SD card. Evidently, all of the Autel software will only install to the internal memory. It kept telling me to delete apps & storage out of my internal memory. It looks like it needs more than 2GB to install.
So, I finally got what I thought was everything installed and went out to my car.
Once the dongle was plugged in and car in the second on position, I had to manually enter my VIN.

Then, the app said it had to update the firmware. Okay, more waiting.

Then, more software download. Each downloading of software took a really long time, both in downloading and self-unzipping. I kept thinking something must have gone wrong but I just waited and waited.

Finally all was finished and the app ran with no problems at all.
 

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But you still need to prove that this can do serious stuff like switching a hv batt from another ED or replacing an airbag or three, or . . .

I have a VCX NANO, similar but specifically for GM - haven't used it yet. Let us know how the AUTEL works.
--
 

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It definitely reads both the 12v and HV batteries.

I am taking my car in for air conditioner service, and I can see the faults in the system with this. I don't want to clear out those codes right now so the technicians can read them.
Steeljan, it’s been about a month since your posting with news of a $50 OBDII reader that is ED compatible.

Got any screen shots that you might share showing the 12V and HV battery condition?

And how did your visit to the dealer go with A/C service?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I should take some screenshots, stay tuned.

As for my air conditioner, this was the 3rd place I took it that repaired Mercedes and told me it would not be a problem to fix. But, no joy again. They said the compressor did not come on and they could not go further since it's an electric car, 300+ volt electric compressor. Argh!!

If this were simply a creature comfort, no big deal. I can do fine without A/C. But my user's manual says that the car uses the A/C on its own to keep the HV batteries cool, as needed.
 

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If this were simply a creature comfort, no big deal. I can do fine without A/C. But my user's manual says that the car uses the A/C on its own to keep the HV batteries cool, as needed.
Does it really run the compressor, or just cycle coolant through the battery and run the radiator fan? I'm unclear on that myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've no idea. If I would have paid attention to how the A/C worked for all the years it was working perfectly, I might have figured it out. But I paid absolutely no attention to the air conditioner until it recently stopped working. Maybe someone else here can fill us in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The Autel OBDII tells me that there is 72.5 psi in the A/C line, which lets me know there is plenty of refrigerant in the uncompressed lines. It also says there is either a short or open in the power to the compressor and that's why it is not turning on. But I don't know where to look for what I'll bet is an open electrical circuit to the compressor. There's no fuse, no relay. And I have no idea how to get a service manual. So frustrating!
 

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It is believed that when the temperature goes above 40C (104F)…

“On vehicles with code (V03) Battery cooling system, the coolant for the high-voltage battery can additionally be cooled by the air conditioning system via a refrigerant/coolant heat exchanger (chiller).”


The electric refrigerant compressor is a high-voltage component and contains an inverter for powering a spiral compressor, which is driven by an electric motor, as well as an integrated control unit. The control unit of the electric refrigerant compressor regulates the speed of the electric motor to the value set by the heater/AC operating unit. The control unit communicates with the drive-train control unit via LIN. This only acts as a router for the CAN signals from the heater/AC operating unit in this case.

Note, the High-voltage adapter plate fuse box contains a 40 A fuse on the electric refrigerant compressor. PROCEED WITH CAUTION!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
And so... Who here has fixed their electric Smart's air conditioner and how did you do it? Youtube videos all show someone adding refrigerant but when I drill down into the details, none of those are electric Smart's.

I appreciate the technical details with acronyms but I can't put those into layman's terms to help me fix my air conditioner.

Thanks a bunch,
Jan
 

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And so... Who here has fixed their electric Smart's air conditioner and how did you do it? Youtube videos all show someone adding refrigerant but when I drill down into the details, none of those are electric Smart's.

I appreciate the technical details with acronyms but I can't put those into layman's terms to help me fix my air conditioner.

Thanks a bunch,
Jan
Is it any different than the gasoline engine version?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Is it any different than the gasoline engine version?
Totally different. The gasoline engine uses the same belt driven system as all gasoline engines. The electric Smart uses a an electric compressor, no belt, and is powered by the HV battery (300+ Volts).

Also, the gasoline Smart's air conditioner is just a creature comfort for the occupants. The electric Smart Car's air conditioner is also used by the car itself to cool the high voltage batteries.
 

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Totally different. The gasoline engine uses the same belt driven system as all gasoline engines. The electric Smart uses a an electric compressor, no belt, and is powered by the HV battery (300+ Volts).

Also, the gasoline Smart's air conditioner is just a creature comfort for the occupants. The electric Smart Car's air conditioner is also used by the car itself to cool the high voltage batteries.
Well damn, in that case I can't be of any help, sorry
 
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