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Discussion Starter #1
I was not aware that this was an option on the Smart's? According to the site it was available as of autumn 2012.

I wonder how much this option is? Has anyone priced this?

Or is this not available in the US?

I find it kinda odd that they have two options. A 3.3 kW charger or a 22 kW charger. Nothing in the middle? Weird.

Charging.
 

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This is available in Europe. Not sure if everywhere, but certainly in Germany.
It uses 400V 3-phase AC, commonly found in Germany, but not here in US. Hence the option is not available here.

We seem to be having a Betamax v. VHS or Tesla v. Edison contest again: the US is almost entirely J1772 or ChaDeMo now, Europe is divided, mostly using "type 2" plugs that are a little like J1772, but three phase.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I figured it was not available here. I wonder why the ED got limited to the 3.3 kW charger? Why not have a 7.2 option? It is obviously possible if they have the 22 kW option in other countries. I am sure it is some stupid government regulation.

Thanks SuperSmartie!
 

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The dealer told me it wasn't available to us. I was was under the impression the 22Kw charger was DC.

Companies like Brusa already have aftermarket solutions, but you're looking at about $3000 or more.
 

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I figured it was not available here. I wonder why the ED got limited to the 3.3 kW charger? Why not have a 7.2 option? It is obviously possible if they have the 22 kW option in other countries. I am sure it is some stupid government regulation.

Thanks SuperSmartie!
My guess is it's purely economical. For Europe, where most of their market is, it makes no sense to offer an intermediate option between 3.5 and 22 kW. For the few cars they sell in the US, it's prohibitively expensive to offer a special charger just for them.

In my opinion, there's not much value in 7kW anyway: 3.5kW is plenty to charge overnight. No point to use higher power. 7kW is not enough for a quick-charge on a longer trip, still takes 3h for a full charge. So it's not really useful for that either. I can't think of when I would want that power level.
 

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I would definitely benefit from a 7.2kw charger, I often need a bit of a top up of about 25% or so en route. 7.2 would get me that in less than half the time. Approx 2.5 hours for a full charge and about 20% back in half an hour.
 

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Imagine calling up your local power utility company and asking how much it would cost to have your very own transformer installed for a 440v. three phase power receptacle in your garage. Power installations like this are usually only required for elevators, escalators, and large industrial electric motors in the U.S. Not typically found in U.S. residential areas, unless money is no object.
 

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Not overly practical. But with the size of these batteries, a 72 amp level 2 is within the realm of possibility, which would equate to a 17.3Kw charger and achieve full charge in a little over an hour. There are currently many 70, 90, and 100 amp public stations out there, and it would make out-of-range distances quite practical if it meant you only needed to stop for half an hour or even just 15 minutes to meet your charge requirements.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I agree with marc hanna. I think a 7.2 option would be perfect for the ED. It would definitely expand the range and most likely draw more peoples interest to the car knowing that it can charge in just a few hours. 3.3 is just barely acceptable in my situation.
 

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I realize that what I am about to say may be entirely unreasonable, but seeing that it is in our interest as ED drivers, why not consider a coalition to promote and bring 440V stations and 22kW chargers to the US?

Tesla has it's SuperCharger, why not Smart? I can already see the opposition ramping up,

(1) It's a massive waste of time and money
(2) We should just wait for batteries with more capacity
(3) No one would be willing to pay the cost
(4) They would need to be placed every 50 miles
(5) Who has the infrastructure to do that?
 

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You're missing "why roll out a third, incompatible infrastructure, after we already have two competing systems (Tesla and ChaDeMo)?"

We should lobby smart to offer a quick-charge option that works with one of the existing sets of stations. That would be much lower cost to implement (although, as I said before, still unlikely to be economically viable).
 

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You're missing "why roll out a third, incompatible infrastructure, after we already have two competing systems (Tesla and ChaDeMo)?"

We should lobby smart to offer a quick-charge option that works with one of the existing sets of stations. That would be much lower cost to implement (although, as I said before, still unlikely to be economically viable).
From what I've read, the J1772 is the SAE standard. Tesla and Four Japanese companies developed their own connectors, Tesla and CHAdeMO respectively. I got the impression that the reason the other two were created was that these companies were tired of waiting for SAE and they felt that the standard was too weak. Granted the 2009 standard does support up to up to 90 kW.

There are many Chademo charging stations in the SF Bay area where I live, but whenever I visit one, they're sitting there empty. As far as I know only the Nissan Leaf can use them but despite there being hundreds of Leafs around the area, I rarely see them at these stations.

Most people charge at home, but barring the installation of a very high power circuit (which most people cannot afford), the faster connections are still only available publically.
------------

This may be where the tide changes. We are at the forefront of the technological revolution. We, as the current owners, can act to change the future for further generations that would never know the hassle of charging at 3.3 kW.
 

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J1772 will support upto 21.6kW. We don't need any more than that. I see many public stations that are 40, 60, 70, and 90 kW. All these would be fine if we only had a more powerful charger. You don't need any special DC or 3 phase connector.
 

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Hi all, I've had my ED for 4 weeks and love it but I didn't go for the 22kW charger as in the UK it costs £2650 = $4300 which would have been 15% on top of the price for my cabrio with lots of options and buying the battery not leasing. Not sure what Smart were thinking when they priced it up but so far I haven't found anywhere I could have used it. There's rumours of more rapid charging stations arriving on our motorway network but I have other ICE cars for long trips, they are all a bit neglected at the moment...
 

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Hi all, I've had my ED for 4 weeks and love it but I didn't go for the 22kW charger as in the UK it costs £2650 = $4300 which would have been 15% on top of the price for my cabrio with lots of options and buying the battery not leasing...
at least you have the option.
 

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The cost of that optional charger would defeat the gains in cost per mile, and be a deal breaker for me. I don't see it as a viable option in the US even if it was only $1200 more.
 

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The cost of that optional charger would defeat the gains in cost per mile, and be a deal breaker for me. I don't see it as a viable option in the US even if it was only $1200 more.
Agreed, hopefully we see some reasonably priced aftermarket solutions in the future.
 
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