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If you think for one second that a chip can produce an extra 20 HP from a 999cc engine, you should rush out and get one.
 

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You need to check your box. For some reason, your PM's are not activated. I have tried to PM you about the GoPedal several times, but it keeps saying you Private Message box is not working.
 

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Never heard of the #1 Performance Chip before...but it really doesn't matter, they're all snake oil. At least they look more convincing than those hilarious "voltage stabilizers".


Basically, think of it like this: A GoPedal or a Sprint Booster doesn't really make your smart any faster. They basically change the impact of peripherals on the computer, mainly the accelerator pedal. They'll cut down on pedal response time and make pedal response hilariously aggressive...but if you took it to a drag strip you wouldn't go any faster than a stock smart (assuming an otherwise stock smart).

It'll feel like a rocket ship - I've driven a smart with a Sprint Booster before - it feels awesome! But I always have to remember I'm not going any faster, it just feels faster.

IIRC - The only way to get an actual HP kick from the computers in a smart is through an ECU tune, which is a hefty cost compared to these phony "performance" chips.
 
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Never heard of the #1 Performance Chip before...but it really doesn't matter, they're all snake oil. At least they look more convincing than those hilarious "voltage stabilizers".

Performance Chips - Mythbusted - YouTube

Basically, think of it like this: A GoPedal or a Sprint Booster doesn't really make your smart any faster. They basically change the impact of peripherals on the computer, mainly the accelerator pedal. They'll cut down on pedal response time and make pedal response hilariously aggressive...but if you took it to a drag strip you wouldn't go any faster than a stock smart (assuming an otherwise stock smart).

It'll feel like a rocket ship - I've driven a smart with a Sprint Booster before - it feels awesome! But I always have to remember I'm not going any faster, it just feels faster.

IIRC - The only way to get an actual HP kick from the computers in a smart is through an ECU tune, which is a hefty cost compared to these phony "performance" chips.
Have you actually driven a Smart with the ECU tune? I'm interested to see if any performance is really gained.
 

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Have you actually driven a Smart with the ECU tune? I'm interested to see if any performance is really gained.
I have both an engine and transmission tune in my Corvette. The difference can be fairly minimal to quite dramatic, depending on the type of engine, the original state of tune, and how close to the ragged edge you want to run.

Forced induction engines typically see the most benefit, if the tune can allow higher boost pressures.

In naturally aspirated engines, it's more a matter of removing some of the failsafe headroom that manufacturers must provide in order to have an engine survive 100k miles in an uncertain environment running uncertain fuels. In most cases, a tune will optimize air/fuel ratios, typically leaning them out somewhat because running rich is a failsafe against bad fuel, inadequate cooling, or carbon buildup, all of which lead to pinging that is hard for a knock sensor to detect at full throttle. Usually, timing advance is increased and rev limiters are increased as well. Then you get into smaller things, such as altering the temperature and amount of timing that is pulled depending on intake or coolant temps, things like that. There are probably 50 or more parameters that a good tune can access and alter.

In my case, I gained about 25 peak HP, so about 6%, and increased the rev limiter by 300 RPMs to allow the 2 --> 3 shift to get me higher up in the powerband. Combined with a transmission tune that decreased shift times and removed torque manipulation during shifts in sport mode, it's probably a half second faster running a quarter mile, with no other changes.
 

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I have both an engine and transmission tune in my Corvette. The difference can be fairly minimal to quite dramatic, depending on the type of engine, the original state of tune, and how close to the ragged edge you want to run.



Forced induction engines typically see the most benefit, if the tune can allow higher boost pressures.



In naturally aspirated engines, it's more a matter of removing some of the failsafe headroom that manufacturers must provide in order to have an engine survive 100k miles in an uncertain environment running uncertain fuels. In most cases, a tune will optimize air/fuel ratios, typically leaning them out somewhat because running rich is a failsafe against bad fuel, inadequate cooling, or carbon buildup, all of which lead to pinging that is hard for a knock sensor to detect at full throttle. Usually, timing advance is increased and rev limiters are increased as well. Then you get into smaller things, such as altering the temperature and amount of timing that is pulled depending on intake or coolant temps, things like that. There are probably 50 or more parameters that a good tune can access and alter.



In my case, I gained about 25 peak HP, so about 6%, and increased the rev limiter by 300 RPMs to allow the 2 --> 3 shift to get me higher up in the powerband. Combined with a transmission tune that decreased shift times and removed torque manipulation during shifts in sport mode, it's probably a half second faster running a quarter mile, with no other changes.


If the 451 was boosted Stock, the first 3 things I'd do would be intake, exhaust and tune. In my PT Cruiser I was able to go from 187whp to 227whp with those 3 areas worked on. Tq jumped much higher from 213 to 281wtq.

Also don't buy into those "electric super chargers" that go on the intake. They hinder airflow and actually REDUCE performance.
 

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Also don't buy into those "electric super chargers" that go on the intake. They hinder airflow and actually REDUCE performance.
On smaller engines, like the 2 liter used in the Mazda Miata, an electric supercharger can provide a few PSI of boost at the lower speed ranges, and boost power by about 20%:

https://forum.miata.net/vb/showthread.php?t=537959

It would almost definitely work better on a 1 liter or less motor like that in the ICE Smart.
 

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On smaller engines, like the 2 liter used in the Mazda Miata, an electric supercharger can provide a few PSI of boost at the lower speed ranges, and boost power by about 20%:



https://forum.miata.net/vb/showthread.php?t=537959



It would almost definitely work better on a 1 liter or less motor like that in the ICE Smart.


Since he was talking about the chips, I meant this type/price range.



I have no doubt there are some truly functioning ones, but those cheap insert ones I believe are pure garbage. You have the motor sitting in the middle of your air intake tube.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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Agreed. That link you showed is garbage. The electric supercharger I referenced is pulling a few kilowatts of power. This one is only doing 200 watts. You'd be lucky to get half a PSI at idle.
 
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