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Took a long trip to northern california. Used a PLX obd ii reader to keep an eye on everything. Went to the gas station just prior to coming back and after i filled up the car and started it up, it shut down. No lights were given or anything. got it started back up and used the reader to check the codes... no codes. however, some readiness monitors were suddenly showing as incomplete (please reference pictures. what do they mean? how do i fix the problem? how do i clear them? Any help is much appreciated.

-Dustin
 

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You may have flooded the charcoal canister which is part of the evaporative emission control system when you refueled the car. You may also get a strong gasoline vapor smell as well. Just drive the car and as fuel is consumed, this condition should clear up. When refueling, set the fuel delivery nozzle on it's slowest setting and when it clicks off, don't try and top off. I also found that it is a good idea to let the tank run down at least half way before refueling. If no codes were set, you shouldn't have any worries. If you do get a code, read it and then delete it. If it resets, you have a hard fault and need to look into the cause.
 

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The monitors for the various on-board systems only run under very specific enabling conditions. Since a failure to properly secure the gas cap can cause a evaporative system failure that monitor may reset after a refueling event. Typically that monitor will only run when the fuel level is between 15% and 85% so it will not run until some of the fuel load burns off.

The secondary air system only runs on starts in a very specific temperature range so the same thing applies. There is nothing you can or should do other than drive normally.
 

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I have 3 smart cars at my shop right now that needs to complete it's smog in california. The readiness indicators are reset either when the battery dies or a check engine light is reset. Each one of those test will complete after it follows a per set, pre programmed drive cycle.

It's not based on mileage but based on the quality of the drive.

Evap, secondary air usually completes with between 1/4 - 3/4 tank of gas, engine warmed up, and engine is decelerated without stepping on the brakes from approx 60 mph down to 30 mph.

I have yet to find the exact drive cycle for the smart car but this is based on experiences with other cars and the smart cars.

You will also need to complete a few cold start up where the intake air temp and coolant temp are within a few degrees of each other. You'll hear the air pump kick in for the secondary air readiness test. I would advice to not move the car for 2-3 cycles of this, it takes about 30 seconds for it to complete... at the same time your HO2S, the heated oxygen sensor will also be running it's test after you take off.

The last one that takes the longest to complete is the catalyst converter, however it's also the one required in california to complete even though you may have one of the other ones incomplete to run the smog test. California enacted a new smog test that went into effect mid 2014 which doesnt require the cars to run on a dyno and the sniffer tube stuck up it's exhaust, it's all based on more indepth reading into the OBD II port.. it compares calibration data with factory and checks your exhaust thru ur factory o2 sensor.. etc.. etc etc...

I still have yet to get the catalyst to set on 3 smart cars so far, but again it's not really distance but based on the quality of the drive and it has to hit a specific amount of drive cycles for it to complete. The generic cycle is something along the line of... 35-45 mph at 3-5 mins and gentle acceleration up to 55-60 mph for 3-7 mins depending on how old it was outside when you started the car... And if you live too far away from the freeway and the catalyst converter gets too hot, your readiness may never set =P... anyways.. enough info for one post..

Larry
 

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Actually I just saw the pictures you posted on the first post...

Those two are quite easy to complete.. the evap and secondary air.. as I mentioned above.. secondary air is tested upon start up. Evap is with the tank 1/4-3/4 full and is tested during a highway speed deceleration where the engine is generating vacuum and the Evap system can test for leaks.

Again, we really only care about the readiness monitors when it comes to smog checks. :)

If your car shuts down again.. I would get the car checked, it's not uncommon for the fuel pump assembly to start to fail... if it does, check the fuse first. =P...

Larry
 

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I have 3 smart cars at my shop right now that needs to complete it's smog in california. The readiness indicators are reset either when the battery dies or a check engine light is reset. Each one of those test will complete after it follows a per set, pre programmed drive cycle.

It's not based on mileage but based on the quality of the drive.

Evap, secondary air usually completes with between 1/4 - 3/4 tank of gas, engine warmed up, and engine is decelerated without stepping on the brakes from approx 60 mph down to 30 mph.

I have yet to find the exact drive cycle for the smart car but this is based on experiences with other cars and the smart cars.

You will also need to complete a few cold start up where the intake air temp and coolant temp are within a few degrees of each other. You'll hear the air pump kick in for the secondary air readiness test. I would advice to not move the car for 2-3 cycles of this, it takes about 30 seconds for it to complete... at the same time your HO2S, the heated oxygen sensor will also be running it's test after you take off.

The last one that takes the longest to complete is the catalyst converter, however it's also the one required in california to complete even though you may have one of the other ones incomplete to run the smog test. California enacted a new smog test that went into effect mid 2014 which doesnt require the cars to run on a dyno and the sniffer tube stuck up it's exhaust, it's all based on more indepth reading into the OBD II port.. it compares calibration data with factory and checks your exhaust thru ur factory o2 sensor.. etc.. etc etc...

I still have yet to get the catalyst to set on 3 smart cars so far, but again it's not really distance but based on the quality of the drive and it has to hit a specific amount of drive cycles for it to complete. The generic cycle is something along the line of... 35-45 mph at 3-5 mins and gentle acceleration up to 55-60 mph for 3-7 mins depending on how old it was outside when you started the car... And if you live too far away from the freeway and the catalyst converter gets too hot, your readiness may never set =P... anyways.. enough info for one post..

Larry
Hence another reason I'm sooo glad I don't live in Commiefornia...>:D

They have the ability to fail a car that is functioning completely normal, and to manufacture's specifications... Just because some tree huggers got a burr up their butt 20 years ago....:|


Rant done...:D
 

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Hence another reason I'm sooo glad I don't live in Commiefornia...>:D

They have the ability to fail a car that is functioning completely normal, and to manufacture's specifications... Just because some tree huggers got a burr up their butt 20 years ago....:|


Rant done...:D
Valid rant.. I'm grateful for the cleaner air but being in the auto industry and someone who likes to play with his toys.. I wish there was some exception to the rule =P.. I feel like it's just all money and politics =P...

Larry
 

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I feel like it's just all money and politics =P...

Larry
You are correct. Unfortunately, California has none of the former, and too much of the latter...:|

At some point you think folks would wake up and realize it's all these stupid laws and free handouts that are the reason California is basically a bankrupt state...
 

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I still have yet to get the catalyst to set on 3 smart cars so far, but again it's not really distance but based on the quality of the drive and it has to hit a specific amount of drive cycles for it to complete. The generic cycle is something along the line of... 35-45 mph at 3-5 mins and gentle acceleration up to 55-60 mph for 3-7 mins depending on how old it was outside when you started the car... And if you live too far away from the freeway and the catalyst converter gets too hot, your readiness may never set =P... anyways.. enough info for one post..

Larry
The drive cycle generally requires two trips to complete. The following usually works on most cars. I found this on a Mercedes forum. This assumes no current or pending fault codes. The two long decel periods test the oxygen storage capability of the catalyst.
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Here is the procedure I found. However, be aware that conditions must be exactly right to reset. It may take several tries over many days.
The OBDII drive cycle begins with a cold start (coolant temperature below 122 degrees F and the coolant and air temperature sensors within 11 degrees of one another).

NOTE: The ignition key must not be on prior to the cold start otherwise the heated oxygen sensor diagnostic may not run.

1. As soon as the engine starts, idle the engine in drive for two and a half minutes with the A/C and rear defrost on. OBDII checks oxygen sensor heater circuits, air pump and EVAP purge.

2. Turn the A/C and rear defrost off, and accelerate to 55 mph at half throttle. OBDII checks for ignition misfire, fuel trim and canister purge.

3. Hold at a steady state speed of 55 mph for three minutes.

OBDII monitors EGR, air pump, O2 sensors and canister purge.

4. Decelerate (coast down) to 20 mph without braking or depressing the clutch. OBDII checks EGR and purge functions.

5. Accelerate back to 55 to 60 mph at æ throttle. OBDII checks misfire, fuel trim and purge again.

6. Hold at a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for five minutes.

OBDII monitors catalytic converter efficiency, misfire, EGR, fuel trim, oxygen sensors and purge functions.

7. Decelerate (coast down) to a stop without braking. OBDII makes a final check of EGR and canister purge.
--------
 

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Smart double wrench

My Smart Car has a double wrench service reminder to return to the mother ship for an inspection (oil change), our neighbourhood service stations are good enough to do this. I get a negative day countdown from June 13, 2015 ( -54) really not impressive. No buttons and whistles are going to clear that. What on board diagnostic code do you clear to remove that bug?
 

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1-turn the key to the on position and press the button on left side of spedometer twice, holding it in on the second tap.(tap quickly, sort of like your double clicking a mouse. the service indicator should be blinking even when you turn the key off)

2-turn key off while still holding the button down, release button afterwards-this was important

3-without wasting any time press and hold the same button (on left) and then quickly turn the key to the on position again. wait ten seconds and the indicator should stop flashing. the mileage indicator will say 10,000 which indicates when your next oil change is due(if that is the service that was needed)

Yes very similar to the other posts but the difference is holding it down on the second tap and releasing it after turning the key off, then pressing it again instead of just holding it down the whole time.


This has worked for me over the last 142,000 miles (228526 km) if it doesn't work after 3 or 4 tres, wait about 1/2 hour and try again. the computer stops listening to the reset after a few tries.

Here is a video on Youtube.com that shows how it works.
 

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I have yet to find the exact drive cycle for the smart car but this is based on experiences with other cars and the smart cars.

You will also need to complete a few cold start up where the intake air temp and coolant temp are within a few degrees of each other. You'll hear the air pump kick in for the secondary air readiness test. I would advice to not move the car for 2-3 cycles of this, it takes about 30 seconds for it to complete... at the same time your HO2S, the heated oxygen sensor will also be running it's test after you take off.

The last one that takes the longest to complete is the catalyst converter, however it's also the one required in california to complete even though you may have one of the other ones incomplete to run the smog test. California enacted a new smog test that went into effect mid 2014 which doesnt require the cars to run on a dyno and the sniffer tube stuck up it's exhaust, it's all based on more indepth reading into the OBD II port.. it compares calibration data with factory and checks your exhaust thru ur factory o2 sensor.. etc.. etc etc...

I still have yet to get the catalyst to set on 3 smart cars so far, but again it's not really distance but based on the quality of the drive and it has to hit a specific amount of drive cycles for it to complete. The generic cycle is something along the line of... 35-45 mph at 3-5 mins and gentle acceleration up to 55-60 mph for 3-7 mins depending on how old it was outside when you started the car... And if you live too far away from the freeway and the catalyst converter gets too hot, your readiness may never set =P... anyways.. enough info for one post..

Larry

Hi Larry,


Down here in L.A., I was notified recently that my car is no longer smog-exempt, and I need to pass a smog check. Predictably, the standard smog test failed, even when I went to the local BAR referee. I've been going around in circles for a few months, and no one has an answer for me.


The problem, according to the BAR referee, is that the OBD CAT monitor shows no data. I found out that it may be because I also need to complete a specific drive cycle for that particular monitor readout to finally show up.


I assume you finally got at least one of your 450's to pass? If it is just a matter of completing that specific drive cycle, do you know the steps I need to take? Is there something else you know about this whole smog test pass issue?


Thank you for any help you can provide! If it will be easier, I can pass along a phone number or email address for more effective communication.
 

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The drive cycle generally requires two trips to complete. The following usually works on most cars. I found this on a Mercedes forum. This assumes no current or pending fault codes. The two long decel periods test the oxygen storage capability of the catalyst.
---------------
Here is the procedure I found. However, be aware that conditions must be exactly right to reset. It may take several tries over many days.
The OBDII drive cycle begins with a cold start (coolant temperature below 122 degrees F and the coolant and air temperature sensors within 11 degrees of one another).

NOTE: The ignition key must not be on prior to the cold start otherwise the heated oxygen sensor diagnostic may not run.

1. As soon as the engine starts, idle the engine in drive for two and a half minutes with the A/C and rear defrost on. OBDII checks oxygen sensor heater circuits, air pump and EVAP purge.

2. Turn the A/C and rear defrost off, and accelerate to 55 mph at half throttle. OBDII checks for ignition misfire, fuel trim and canister purge.

3. Hold at a steady state speed of 55 mph for three minutes.

OBDII monitors EGR, air pump, O2 sensors and canister purge.

4. Decelerate (coast down) to 20 mph without braking or depressing the clutch. OBDII checks EGR and purge functions.

5. Accelerate back to 55 to 60 mph at æ throttle. OBDII checks misfire, fuel trim and purge again.

6. Hold at a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for five minutes.

OBDII monitors catalytic converter efficiency, misfire, EGR, fuel trim, oxygen sensors and purge functions.

7. Decelerate (coast down) to a stop without braking. OBDII makes a final check of EGR and canister purge.
--------
Will this sequence work on a 450? And it sounds like item #8 needs to read: Dance with a unicorn while eating skittles....
 

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I have a 5 step one that has worked on both the 450s I have.
The trick is to find a 5 mile road with no cars, no lights, no stop signs so you could maintain 40-55mph @ 25% throttle for 5 Min.

1. With fuel 1/4 to 3/4 full, Start Cold; Warm up 5 min (Coolant 160 F / 71 C)
2. Accelerate to 40-55mph @ 25% throttle; Maintain for 5 Min
3. Coast Down (No Brake) to 20mph or less, Stop vehicle, Allow engine to idle for 10 sec, Turn key off, Wait 1 Min
4. Restart and Accelerate to 40-55mph @ 25% throttle; Maintain for 2 Min
5. Decelerate using the brake to 20mph or less, Stop vehicle, idle for 10 sec, Turn key off, Wait 1 Min

I started the car as normal and drove 10 miles or so to that rare 5 mile long deserted stretch of road warming the coolant up so it's really only a 4 step process.
 

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Mailman -- Thank you for this procedure. I tried over a dozen times -- probably twice that -- still no go. Here are the failures:
• Catalyst monitor incomplete
• Evap monitor incomplete.

All other sensors are fine. There are no catalytic converter errors. Just those two.

To reiterate -- I have a 2005 450 commissioned in 2007 by G&K. 100K on the clock. I can't pass smog due to the sensor errors.
 

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wrytre, I couldn't get mine to complete (for me it has the 'O2 heating system monitor') until I got a new sensor.

The state inspector gave me a hint to look at the O2 heating system circuit because that monitor usually completes first. If that one doesn't complete, the readiness monitors down the line 'can't' complete...
There seems to be a sensor involved in each 'readiness monitor test' - check that all the sensors are working properly.

Here are the words from the state (CO) inspector until I got the upstream O2 sensor replaced:
"Ran a state obd test and catalytic converter monitor and heated oxygen sensor monitor are not complete. Pending DTCs may be holding up monitor."

I got the bad sensor replaced and did the 4 steps I listed and drove back to the mechanic and he confirmed the readiness monitors were complete with a snap on tool (2 way $$$$ scanner).

I wish you luck as I had to wait a month for a sensor to come in from germany, and that was in November 2019, before the virus ht.
 

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wrytre, I couldn't get mine to complete (for me it has the 'O2 heating system monitor') until I got a new sensor.

The state inspector gave me a hint to look at the O2 heating system circuit because that monitor usually completes first. If that one doesn't complete, the readiness monitors down the line 'can't' complete...
There seems to be a sensor involved in each 'readiness monitor test' - check that all the sensors are working properly.

Here are the words from the state (CO) inspector until I got the upstream O2 sensor replaced:
"Ran a state obd test and catalytic converter monitor and heated oxygen sensor monitor are not complete. Pending DTCs may be holding up monitor."

I got the bad sensor replaced and did the 4 steps I listed and drove back to the mechanic and he confirmed the readiness monitors were complete with a snap on tool (2 way $$$$ scanner).

I wish you luck as I had to wait a month for a sensor to come in from germany, and that was in November 2019, before the virus ht.
I'm a little confused. There are no problems indicated with the 02 sensors. Just the "catalyst monitor". Obviously, I'm not a techie/wrench. Just a connoisseur of great engineering and design. Can this Catalyst Monitor sensor be replaced? None of my mechanics have suggested that as a remedy....
 
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