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Discussion Starter #41
Couple of suggestions for you. Use a multimeter to check the voltage of your 12v battery. If it's 12.4v or so and up, you should be fine for awhile. If you don't have a multimeter, borrow one or maybe the McParts stores offer to check your battery for you for free. If you go the McParts store route, it would probably be advisable to make the battery accessible by removing the carpeting and the Styrofoam. There are a couple of fasteners that the McParts store guys might just ignore and try to Conan the thing out. The test unit you are getting will also allow you to test your 12v battery. I would not wait until the 12v battery dies before replacing it. That might be okay with an ICE, but the EV is a whole different story and concern.

On the service program update, any Mercedes dealer should be able to tell you if your car has had that done as long as they have your VIN. If your dealer is a PIA about checking it for you, you can call or e-mail a cooperating dealer like the Mercedes dealer in Cary, NC. They have been very helpful.

Len
2014 EV Coupe 20,000 miles
2014 EV Cabriolet 19,000 miles
 

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Thanks Len. I have a multimeter, so I’ll try that first. I have some other questions about range, but I think I’ll start a new thread for those so as not to clutter this one up.
 

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Second question is how can I tell if my car has had the battery software update?
The battery test unit that you bought will report the firmware date of the battery management system. We have strong empirical evidence (from testing one of sokoloff's cars before and after getting the software update) that the software update changes this version field and therefore you can very likely rely on that output from the test results to tell you if you if the software update was applied to your car if you can't get definitive information from a dealer.

There will be three lines in the report that tell you the production date, the factory acceptance test (installation) date, and the software revision date.
Here's an example from another user who had a battery replacement in 2019 (so showing the most recent battery software version date):
Code:
Battery Production [Y/M/D]: 2019/6/11
Battery-FAT date   [Y/M/D]: 2019/6/12
Rev.[Y/WK/PL] HW:2014/34/0, SW:2014/18/0
Two of the older software revisions that we've seen are:
Code:
Rev.[Y/WK/PL] HW:2012/38/0, SW:2012/35/1
Code:
Rev.[Y/WK/PL] HW:2013/29/0, SW:2013/29/1
Sokoloff's car was upgraded from 2013/29/1 to 2014/18/0 during the service bulletin application last summer.
 

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The battery test unit that you bought will report the firmware date of the battery management system. We have strong empirical evidence (from testing one of sokoloff's cars before and after getting the software update) that the software update changes this version field and therefore you can very likely rely on that output from the test results to tell you if you if the software update was applied to your car if you can't get definitive information from a dealer.
Thanks Jim. The test unit showed up today and I ran the test on one of my Smarts. It has the software update. I'm trying to decipher the rest of the data now, then I'll run a test on my coupe. That's the one that I'm kind of worried about.
 
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