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He's not mine
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Discussion Starter #1
OK, I'm posting to ask advice. The only other car I've sold in the past 20 years I sold for parts. This case may not be much better. That's where your advice would be appreciated.

In early 2008, my 1994(95) Dodge Neon gave up the ghost, died of engine failure, a half year before my smart's delivery was expected. I needed a stop gap car and actually overbought. I picked up a two year old 2006 Nissan Sentra 1.8 S, which turned out to be such a nice little car that when I no longer needed it, I sold it to my mother.

She drove it for more than seven years without incident. But, last year she quit driving at the age of 88. When I had a problem with my smart {not running for 12 weeks of 2016}, I borrowed her unused Sentra. That's when I discovered a big problem ... the car won't go into Reverse. I checked the fluid, just fine. I paid a mechanic close to $300 to tear the thing apart and attempt to fix it. Nope, it needed major work, over $1,000 he said.

So, with that short {sorry} story out of the way ... Mom wants to sell the car and has a potential buyer. It still runs, I cranked it up just today, and it drives just fine ... but no reverse.

We don't expect much for it, but what would be a fair price for the car? Should it be considered another parts car and sign the title over for a token amount? She'd be disappointed by that diagnosis, but that's life.

This is not her car, but it's the same color 2006 Nissan Sentra 1.8 S


TIA
 

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Did the mechanic give any indication of what he/she/they believes is the root cause? I ask because I had a 1982 Mazda GLC 4-door sedan with automatic transmission that blew the planetary gear - in the middle of an intersection (4-way stop light). That happened in 1983. Since the planetary is used for forward and reverse, the car wasn't driveable. I had it repaired. In 1983 dollars it was something like $400 - $500.

Other options:
- buy a reman tranny
- tranny from salvage yards

The question being: If you repair or replace the tranny, does it increase the value of the car enough to recoup the cost of the repair/replacement when you sell it?
 

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He's not mine
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9,617 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Did the mechanic give any indication of what he/she/they believes is the root cause?
I don't recall precisely. But, when we agreed to the attempted fix he thought it might be a clogged filter. And that turned out to not be the case. They spent several hours on the attempt, while I waited. IIRC, the attempted diagnosis ended when the filter was ruled out as the culprit.
Other options:
- buy a reman tranny
- tranny from salvage yards

The question being: If you repair or replace the tranny, does it increase the value of the car enough to recoup the cost of the repair/replacement when you sell it?
We haven't really considered such measures. We don't need the car any longer. I find it doubtful that replacing the transmission would increase the car's value enough to be profitable. Unless, of course, someone here wants to convince me otherwise. In the end, it is an eleven year old economy car, fit or not.

I've heard it said in the past that a car that is in running condition is worth at least $500. But, I don't think that adage applies if you can't back it out of a parking space, LOL.
 

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Super Moderator
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sadly this is way too common a broken car can be worth more in parts than the car is whole. Maybe list it as a motor with a car attached ? Sometimes you can sell them to a repair shop, or individual sho flips cars, or has a car that has other damage and is looking for a bunch of parts from a donor car and strike up a bargain for both of you.

I traded my Expedition with a bad trans,worn out tired, and a bunch of other problems for a motor replacement (I had the motor) on my S10 Blazer. He was going to make an off road mud truck out of it. I got rid of the Expedition, fixed my S10 and it worked out not costing me except for fluids. Maybe you could work out some sort of a trade??
 

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I'd personally put $500 on it, and see if anybody bites....

Obviously, you need to be honest about the reverse issue. As long as the buyer is OK with that, sell it... It's going to sell to somebody looking for a fixer-upper anyways... Lots of guys look for cars with "minor" issues, to fix & flip.

Shoot, I bought my '89 Dodge Daytona 2 years ago for $800, and it didn't run... But it had a rust free body & a lot of potential. Now, I wouldn't sell it for $4K...

 
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