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I had my shifter button start to stick over 3 days, finally jamming completely in Park at work, and I tried everything I could to push it in. I tried pliers (wrapped in cloth), I tried hitting it with my fist (painful), I tried pressing a metal rod on it to get leverage. Nothing. Wouldn't budge. Just as I was about to try a tow, I got on the forums and saw it was a lubrication problem. I tried to remove the shifter knob as suggested in a couple of threads here, but no luck. Mine wouldn't turn, even with a wrench (wrapped in cloth). I decided on one last desperate measure - WD-40. I got the straw and sprayed it in the crack between button and shifter knob in a couple of spots. Worked like magic. Instant un-stuck!

I then took the car into the dealers anyway and had the shifter knob replaced just to be safe, since I doubt WD-40 is an approved lubricant, but now I know I won't get stuck again.
 

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This topic has been covered at length

WD-40 isn't really a lube.
Its a water displacement formula. Excellent for corrosion or drying out distributor caps though.
In another thread and it is so a lube that happens to also have water displacement qualities as well.
That's all I'm going to say....:p
 

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In another thread and it is so a lube that happens to also have water displacement qualities as well.
That's all I'm going to say....:p
Water Displacement Formula Number Forty was originally developed for cleaning the aluminum skin of the Atlas booster rocket.
The base for WD is kerosene, which is not a lubricant. It works as a solvent, but not particularly well.
WD excels at water displacment. Which is why you use it liberally on a wet rifle or shotgun as it evaporates quickly.
Never use it as a gun lube.
Use it on electronics though, as it leaves no residue (or lube).
 

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Y'all debate whether or not WD-40 is a lubricant. But, it appears to have done the trick, at least temporarily, for hajiii. It feels slippery on your fingers. I've used it on squeaky door hinges and sticky locks.

From the WD-40 web site:
WD-40 literally stands for Water Displacement, 40th attempt. That's the name straight out of the lab book used by the chemist who developed WD-40 back in 1953. The chemist, Norm Larsen, was attempting to concoct a formula to prevent corrosion-a task which is done by displacing water. Norm's persistence paid off when he perfected the formula on his 40th try.

While the ingredients in WD-40 are secret, we can tell you what WD-40 does NOT contain. WD-40 does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, wax, graphite, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), or any known cancer-causing agents.

WD-40 is the ultimate multi-purpose problem solver. WD-40 cleans/degreases, penetrates to loosen up stuck parts, prevents corrosion and is a light lubricant.
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What does WD-40 do?

WD-40 fulfills five basic functions:
1. CLEANS: WD-40 gets under dirt, grime and grease to clean. It also dissolves adhesives, allowing easy removal of labels, tape and excess bonding material.
2. DISPLACES MOISTURE: Because WD-40 displaces moisture, it quickly dries out electrical systems to eliminate moisture-induced short circuits.
3. PENETRATES: WD-40 loosens rust-to-metal bonds and frees stuck, frozen or rusted metal parts.
4. LUBRICATES: WD-40's lubricating ingredients are widely dispersed and tenaciously held to all moving parts.
5. PROTECTS: WD-40 protects metal surfaces with corrosion-resistant ingredients to shield against moisture and other corrosive elements.
 

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Water Displacement Formula Number Forty was originally developed for cleaning the aluminum skin of the Atlas booster rocket.
The base for WD is kerosene, which is not a lubricant. It works as a solvent, but not particularly well.
WD excels at water displacment. Which is why you use it liberally on a wet rifle or shotgun as it evaporates quickly.
Never use it as a gun lube.
Use it on electronics though, as it leaves no residue (or lube).
And it works great at cleaning the wrinkled black finish of a Harley engine. Spray it on a cool/warm black Harley engine and watch it evaporate leaving it looking factory new. FYI
 

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When I started working as a mechanic at a GM dealership years ago I was given some advice from some of the olders guys.
"Never let the shop foreman catch you spraying WD-40 on any moving part, you won't make it past your probationary period".
 

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I bet they did not even replace the shifter knob they just lube them and say they replaced it
Why? Is that what you'd do?

I find it amazing that some people are more willing to believe - without any basis - that others are always out the cheat them in some way. In many cases, these others have a lack of trust that is based on their own inability to work on the level with people; that mistrust is based on the belief that others will do to them exactly the same as they've done.

I'm more willing to believe that if a dealership says they replaced something, they replaced something. Especially if they give it to me in writing.

Your pal,
Meat.
 

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if it is a lubrication issue, i guess i don't see the benefit or reasoning behind replacing the shifter. why not just lubricate the existing one? presumably the replacement needs to be lubricated as well so what does replacing the shifter add to the solution? i'm curious.

in one of the other threads, someone took an emery board to the white plastic shifter actuator to smooth off the molding castings and overall clean it up a bit, i think that combined with any number of suitable lubricants should be good preventative maintenance.
 

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WD-40 and Duct Tape. That's the Ticket.

I keep two items in my tool kit: WD-40 and Duct Tape. If something's stuck that should be loose, I WD-40 it. If something's loose that should be stuck, I Duct Tape it.
 

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That is a great one, Mr. Jack!

I keep two items in my tool kit: WD-40 and Duct Tape. If something's stuck that should be loose, I WD-40 it. If something's loose that should be stuck, I Duct Tape it.
Three cheers to you for keeping it simple!!! That covers it all!LOLOL :)
 

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Just reading through the thread and found the WD40 debate interesting. Anyone heard of Jig-A-Loo? I actually represent the company so I thought I'd come in here to give some two sense and maybe answer some questions.

Jig-A-Loo is an invisible silicone-based lubricant and water-repelentand it's great for all around car maintenance. (It also protects and fights rust.) If anyone is interesed, we are letting people try it out for free at Jig-A-Loo - an invisible silicone-based lubricant and water-repellent ! (just download the rebate form).

I'm interested if anyone has any thoughts or is willing to try it out and let me know how it works for them.

Thanks,
Tom with Jig-A-Loo
 

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WD40 is a jack of all trades and a master of none. It's OK as a quick fix if you have nothing else and it is an average multipurpose spray to keep handy. BUT...
If you are at home, there is no excuse for not using something designed for the job.

The problem with WD40 is that although it initially starts off hydrophobic (repels water), after a while it penetrates materials and makes them hydroscopic (collects water).

There are 2 things you should be using to lube non engine parts of a smart.
White lithium grease or silicone lube.

I suspect this Jig-a-loo stuff will work a hell of a lot better than WD40, especially over a duration of more than a few days. As said above, WD40 isn't really a proper lube and it evaporates quickly leaving nothing behind. Silicone lube will create a layer that continuously lubes over a much longer period, it also keeps plastic and rubber more healthy.
 
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