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aka '24-42'
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This is my selection.




In a drenching rain, I stopped at a 'Rest Area' got out of my Smart and in less than 10 seconds, opened the Lees-ure Lite (with all bedding, and luggage dry inside), I also was inside out of the rain and standing up (No the window awning wasn't put up). I recommend making this a prerequisite for purchase of any camper.

BTW: Everything inside stayed dry when I left in the morning with it still raining. Closed the camper wet, dried the cloth exterior down the road when it stopped raining.

Donald LaFavor
 

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I really like the Signatour camper. But they are 5,000km away, whereas the Lees-ure Lite factory is one hour from my home.

As with so many things, shipping is the killer... I think I'm going to DIY something.
 

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We manucacture the SignaTour Camper in the Tampa, Florida area. They weigh in at under 800lbs and have a tongue weight of 87 lbs. The inside has a folding queen size cushion that stores under the cabinet allowing you to get in and out without climbing all over your bedding. Check us out at SignaTourCampers.com. Thanks
 

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I really like the Signatour camper. But they are 5,000km away, whereas the Lees-ure Lite factory is one hour from my home.

As with so many things, shipping is the killer... I think I'm going to DIY something.
be sure to check out the Mitchell TTT and teardrop forum. You should have NO problem building one for 300 Lb. If you have any questions PM me. There really isn't that much to them. A lot of folks are DIYing them. Best to keep it lightweight for a smart. For me, a smart should tow a little overnighter, not a fully equipped tear. I'm actually looking to build one around 250#, but that will take some special build techniques. For 300 Lb, it's pretty straightforward.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
be sure to check out the Mitchell TTT and teardrop forum. You should have NO problem building one for 300 Lb. If you have any questions PM me. There really isn't that much to them. A lot of folks are DIYing them. Best to keep it lightweight for a smart. For me, a smart should tow a little over nighter, not a fully equipped tear. I'm actually looking to build one around 250#, but that will take some special build techniques. For 300 Lb, it's pretty straightforward.
Perhaps one could get some plans (scanned) from teardrop.net and adapt it from one (or more) of these? :confused:


Here another site with teardrop plans teardropplans.com


:cool:
 

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the key to keeping it light is to go easy on the galley. Think camp stove with a small propane can, and some lightweight cooking gear (more like camping). Most tears are over built -- it's the number one thing (besides width) that folks say they would change (they built too heavy).
 

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the key to keeping it light is to go easy on the galley. Think camp stove with a small propane can, and some lightweight cooking gear (more like camping). Most tears are over built -- it's the number one thing (besides width) that folks say they would change (they built too heavy).
I totally agree! Nearly all teardrops I've seen are far too overbuilt - therefore too heavy for me - although the shell and basic components without the "luxury" elements are well within target weight for a smart.
 

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I totally agree! Nearly all teardrops I've seen are far too overbuilt - therefore too heavy for me - although the shell and basic components without the "luxury" elements are well within target weight for a smart.
1/8 (3 mm) slins bonded to a 1 inch foam core for the sides and top, 2 ich core for the floor. For the top, bond the core to on facesheet, score the foam through (90%) ever 25 mm (1 inch) or so and curv it around the outside, then glue on the last 3 mm playwood skin on the outside. Super lightweight, super strong. THe on;y thing lighter would be to go with composite skins (but a bigger hassle).
 

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Teardrops of conventional design all share a common problem..... leakage around the huge rear hatch. That's why SignaTour's is flat on the back. Your super lightweight ideas are great, if the roads were all glassy smooth, and their were no sidewinds. Without using totally spaceage materials, strength and lightness cannot be attained that will also last. I put in a lot of research before settling on SignaTour. It works, plain and simple.
 

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I'm a structural engineer -- this is what I do for a living (more than 26 years experience). I have investigated the topic quite deeply including historical build techniques and current trends. I understand both the aerodynamic and shock-loading as well as g-loading that a trailer will see. I believe I'm fully qualified both technically and practically to do the design and analysis of a teardrop trailer.

There is no doubt in my mind that someone can build a 300 lb trailer that will be serviceable and durable.

If one wants to use more exotic materials (aerospace) it can be done even lighter.

I don't doubt your trailer works. Personally I think it too heavy for a smart -- especially when loaded with gear.

BTW, are you a supporting vendor?
 
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