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Smart Fortwo ED3 451
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello people.

I had a genius idea (or at least I think so). For those who live in a house and don't like to pay for the electricity.
There can be installed solar panels on the roof, a controller and a small battery, as well as an inverter 12V-110V ...
The panels get the power and through the controller, it is sent to the small battery and the car from which the electricity is directed to the house, but only after it is charged (which should not be long considering that the panels will be about 5000 watts).
A thick cable is passed from the car to the inverter and from it the 110V cable goes to the electric panel of the house.
When the car is not connected, the power from the small battery is used.

Any comments on the subject?

Thanks in advance 馃檪.
 

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Several years back I recall reading about 451 ICE Smarts that had a 100 watt solar panel roof. The panel was used to charge the battery and allow cooling without the engine running.

I鈥檓 sure 100 watts wouldn鈥檛 be anywhere near enough power to charge an ED battery, but it was awesome for trickle charging the 12v battery and running low wattage accessories without deprecating the battery.

 

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Smart Fortwo ED3 451
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Several years back I recall reading about 451 ICE Smarts that had a 100 watt solar panel roof. The panel was used to charge the battery and allow cooling without the engine running.

I鈥檓 sure 100 watts wouldn鈥檛 be anywhere near enough power to charge an ED battery, but it was awesome for trickle charging the 12v battery and running low wattage accessories without deprecating the battery.

Hello.

Sorry, but I was talking about the roof on the house.

Thanks :)
 

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2017 453 ForTwo Coupe ED
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I think Tesla can do this today (use car as off-grid power with solar charging of car if the solar infrastructure is in place) and possibly the new Ford pickup as well. Effectively the car becomes the house battery. It is a good idea if you already have a battery electric car, since you don't have to buy a second house battery, but it has limitations (if you want to go for a drive, no house power and adds a lot of charge/discharge cycles to your car battery). My ideal situation would be to have solar and something like a tesla powerwall, then charge the car from the house's reserve power, but you have to pay for twice as many batteries.
 

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The general concept exists, except the batteries used are huge. See Tesla solar and PowerWall.

Ford has a different but novel idea as well with the upcoming F-150 Lightning. While the truck is plugged in it can act as power source for your house in a power outage.

A small battery may not get you through the night if you're considering power independence, meaning not connecting to public utility electricity. You may also have excess energy that you'll need/want to shunt somewhere if the solar is producing more than what the house and batteries use...
 

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I鈥檓 sure 100 watts wouldn鈥檛 be anywhere near enough power to charge an ED battery, but it was awesome for trickle charging the 12v battery and running low wattage accessories without deprecating the battery.
It is if you are not in a hurry. The battery pack is 17.5 kilowatt hours so it would take about 100 hours to charge back up from a 40 percent SOC.
 

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The general concept exists, except the batteries used are huge. See Tesla solar and PowerWall.

Ford has a different but novel idea as well with the upcoming F-150 Lightning. While the truck is plugged in it can act as power source for your house in a power outage.

A small battery may not get you through the night if you're considering power independence, meaning not connecting to public utility electricity. You may also have excess energy that you'll need/want to shunt somewhere if the solar is producing more than what the house and batteries use...
If you kept the power draw to only a refrigerator the air handler of a gas furnace, and minimal (LED) lighting, say an average of 400 watts, the Smart would keep them going for about 40 hours.
 
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