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Discussion Starter #1
I don’t own or lease a 453 ED, but I’m considering one. I do travel quite a bit fo work, sometimes for several weeks at a time, and don’t do an incredible amount of driving when I am home. Is there a ‘storage mode’ for the car, maybe a way to manage the battery so that it stays within a certain state of charge for longer stays in the driveway or garage?


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There is no storage mode. As long as the car is not being stored for more than a few days periods at temperatures lower than -20C (-4F) and higher than 40C (104F), it can simply be parked, ideally at about a 70% state of charge. If it is going to be exposed to temperatures, outside of this range for extended periods, it will need to be kept plugged in so that pack heating or cooling can operate if needed. This will mean it will be get to and stay charged at the less than optimal-for-storage 100% state of charge (SOC) At cold temperatures, the impact of the pack life of storing it at 100% is minimal. But in a very hot climate, sitting for an extended time period at 100% SOC could be deleterious to the long-term life of the pack so storing it in an air conditioned space would be preferred.

Also, if it is going to be stored for more than, say, 3 months, the 12 volt battery in the car may need to be maintained on a trickle-charger, no different than an IC engine car.

Lithium batteries have very little self-discharge and when the car is switched off there is no quiescent drain, so the high voltage traction battery can probably sit for a year at least with little effect.

We can give you more specific advice if you tell us where you will be storing the car. Phoenix? Fairbanks? St Louis? If the latter, don't worry about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There is no storage mode. As long as the car is not being stored for more than a few days periods at temperatures lower than -20C (-4F) and higher than 40C (104F), it can simply be parked, ideally at about a 70% state of charge. If it is going to be exposed to temperatures, outside of this range for extended periods, it will need to be kept plugged in so that pack heating or cooling can operate if needed. This will mean it will be get to and stay charged at the less than optimal-for-storage 100% state of charge (SOC) At cold temperatures, the impact of the pack life of storing it at 100% is minimal. But in a very hot climate, sitting for an extended time period at 100% SOC could be deleterious to the long-term life of the pack so storing it in an air conditioned space would be preferred.

Also, if it is going to be stored for more than, say, 3 months, the 12 volt battery in the car may need to be maintained on a trickle-charger, no different than an IC engine car.

Lithium batteries have very little self-discharge and when the car is switched off there is no quiescent drain, so the high voltage traction battery can probably sit for a year at least with little effect.

We can give you more specific advice if you tell us where you will be storing the car. Phoenix? Fairbanks? St Louis? If the latter, don't worry about it.


Thanks for the reply, and the information. My car would be in Iowa, where the insides of garages can get hot in the summer, and cold in the winter. I don’t have AC in the garage, or heat.


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Well knowing you don't live in Phoenix or Fairbanks makes my comment much more complicated that it needed to be. Assuming the garage has a window or some source of ventilation, summer heat will be no problem - so for 9 months out of the year, you don't have to do anything - just park the car at about 70% SOC and don't worry. If you are storing the car in December through February, I'd store it at about 70% SOC and put a small space heater in the garage - just enough heat to keep the car above 20F or so. Alternatively, keep it plugged in.
 
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