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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys!

I was talking to Butch today to see what he was going to do to his new car that he purchased. He got the 2012 Cadillac CTS Performance Coupe in tincoat red. The car is such a sweet ride, but he wants to give it a little bit more performance. He's going to do the exhaust eventually, but he was looking at what other developments were going on with the Cadillac. He was talking about tonight that he saw that on their forums; members were doing a throttle body spacer and a bored out throttle body.

Here are my questions: Has anybody added a throttle body spacer or do you think that a throttle body spacer would give the smart any performance benefits? I can get phenolic and have Butch's friend machine one out for me.

Also, Butch saw that many guys were adding oil separators because they saw that their throttle bodies were getting gummed up with oil. I know Donnyone added an oil catch can to his turbo system, but has anybody added one to a N/A smart? Butch said many of the newer cars could benefit from a catch can and I wanted to know if I should add one as well as I have noticed that my throttle body is gummy when I take my intake apart to clean the filter and also, how much would a setup cost?

Thank you guys as always! You're all my extended family! :D
 

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Look at Jet Fuel's set up. He put his breather hose into the filter box on the upper side of the filter so that any oil residue deposits on the filter, which gets thrown away, instead of gumming up the throttle body. Now how cool is that? Short stubby hose and filtered breather vapors. Good idea.
 

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Hey guys!

has anybody added one to a N/A smart? Butch said many of the newer cars could benefit from a catch can and I wanted to know if I should add one as well as I have noticed that my throttle body is gummy when I take my intake apart to clean the filter and also, how much would a setup cost?
On my turbo car and on my smart, i just bought a valve cover breather filter from pep boys. Looks like a mini K&N cone. It fits on the valve cover barb. It's not some catchy named catch-can from ketchikan. I just swap them out every so often when they get really dirty.
 

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Boring out the throttle body and installing a larger butterfly valve most likely would help the higher end (however, a major job).. The spacer probably not so much as the plastic manifold has long runners anyway... If your dripping oil back into the intake track your engine it's starting to experince excessive blow by conditions as the hose attached to the valve cover is the inlet side for fresh air for the PCV system...In other words fresh air goes in the top of the valve cover ,thru the engine crankcase, out thru a red PCV valve on the front side of the engine and then to the the plastic manifold behind the throttle body...:wink:

When you put a turbo on these engines with stock plumbing you have to rely on the PCV valve to work properly or the crankcase will become pressurized and blow oil out the valve cover hose under boost...:eek:
 

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Look at Jet Fuel's set up. He put his breather hose into the filter box on the upper side of the filter so that any oil residue deposits on the filter, which gets thrown away, instead of gumming up the throttle body. Now how cool is that? Short stubby hose and filtered breather vapors. Good idea.
That concept was implemented from the "low budget cold air intake" thread :wink:
 

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...what came first???the stubby intake or the low budget???
...naaahhh..who cares...it's a win win situation...

Jetfuel....no longer a stubby....
 

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...what came first???the stubby intake or the low budget???
...naaahhh..who cares...it's a win win situation...

Jetfuel....no longer a stubby....
If memory serves me correctly the "stubby" came first but I don't recall a valve cover vent hose into the air filter box when you ran the stubby... :confused:
Hair drier came next and ya been on cloud 9 ever since...:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well I'm going to revive the oil catch can idea. There are some that say they are beneficial on N/A engines when pushing the engine really hard (like I do) or when the car is at idle (which mine is in stop-and-go traffic so much). This idea came back again after I saw all of the problems with all of the new direct injected engines without catch cans. After around 5-10k miles, the car (typically VW and Audi) have to go back to the dealership, have the heads removed and be walnut blasted.

Butch and I are going to be installing our own custom made setup as a temporary (to first see how much I catch). This will involve the Lowes oil separator brand Kobalt (as seen in the below picture). We are going to tear out the internals, install piping as baffling and a wire mesh material to serve as surface area for the oil to grab on to. We want the oil to catch in the can, but we don't want too much restriction or we could start blowing seals.

 

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Brett, have you thought about the possibility that the oil is coming from your K&N oiled filter? You are using such an animal aren't you? It is one of the things I don't like about mine and that is that it is difficult to get excess oil off of them after cleaning them.
 

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Brett, If you find you are filling up the catch can means your engine is getting in a bad way... Since I'm turbo'd I can induce more crankcase pressure over NA's and yet I do not experience much oil on my K&N valve cover mounted breather..Your catch can seems like a waste of money and time, but on the other hand you'll find out the condition of your motor...:wink:
 

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Brett, If you find you are filling up the catch can means your engine is getting in a bad way... Since I'm turbo'd I can induce more crankcase pressure over NA's and yet I do not experience much oil on my K&N valve cover mounted breather..Your catch can seems like a waste of money and time, but on the other hand you'll find out the condition of your motor...:wink:

+1. If you're catching oil, your in trouble....
 

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Well I'm going to revive the oil catch can idea. There are some that say they are beneficial on N/A engines when pushing the engine really hard (like I do) or when the car is at idle (which mine is in stop-and-go traffic so much). This idea came back again after I saw all of the problems with all of the new direct injected engines without catch cans. After around 5-10k miles, the car (typically VW and Audi) have to go back to the dealership, have the heads removed and be walnut blasted.
The above premise is flawed. The carbon accumulation on the intake valves is not related to the crankcase ventilation system. It is due to direct in-cylinder fuel injection resulting in dry intake manifold runners. This allows carbon to accumulate on the intake valves during high-overlap cam timing used to mimic exhaust gas recirculation. Typical port-injected engines have fuel sprayed into the port that helped wash the carbon off, assuming one did not drive like granny. (Who in their right mind would?)

The crankcase hose to the air filter housing is used to admit fresh filtered air into the crankcase. If oil is coming out of there then there is something wrong causing excessive crankcase pressure. The crankcase should under a slight vacuum with the engine running.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Butch Read the thread

Oil still does get sucked in through the PCV system even on a non direct injected engine, but the fuel flowing through the intake manifold washes most of it away except if the engine is force inducted or driven very HARD. Then, oil blow by does get on the valves which is why you should do an upper engine cleaning now and then or run a separator. The problem with the cheap air compressor separators is that they are good at getting out the water condensation, but very bad at removing oil, so when someone puts one in and sees all the dirty black water, they think its oil that it's catching, but its not, it's mostly water and not oil. It's worse if it has a filter in it because the oil very quickly blocks up the filter. Then, you have pressure build up in the crank case. VERY BAD! Oil seals will start to leak and if bad enough, you can loose the ring seal. It has to be a REAL air oil separator to work right; Careful baffling inside it to allow the oil not to pass through. That's why you will never see a clear one or a plastic one. You can't weld in the baffles to the housing from those units. It's complex baffling inside.
 

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Not so fast here... OK your driving harder, your injectors are pouring more fuel into the port, your removing more oil from the higher level of blowby... Kind of a wash, isn't it???

In your case Brett what's more important is where is the oil coming from... out of the hose on the valve cover or between the PCV valve and the manifold on the front side of the engine ??
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Paul, the installation would be from the valve cover to the intake tube. Is the PCV system a restricted orifice system or a rattle type PCV system?
 
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