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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The 451 has a rather interesting assortment of fasteners -- Torx, phillips, standard hex head, external torx, and who knows what else!

It would be very handy to have a reference list of all the tools and sizes you need for routine maintenance/disassembly projects. For example, a Torx 20 and 25 are common to the body panels, and a 13mm socket is needed to remove the wiper arms.

Add your info and I'll try to compile a comprehensive list of tools that will allow you to work on the 451 without investing in unnecessary "sets" of wrenches and sockets when you might just need a few.

Tool List for the Smart 451


Tack remover

Torx drivers ("L" keys, sockets, or screwdriver-style bits) sizes T10, T20, T25, T27, T40, T45, T47, T50

Metric sockets, sizes 7mm (hose clamps), 10mm (electrical ground points), 13mm, 14mm (exhaust system), 15mm deep (lug bolts), 18mm (caliper frames), 22mm, 24mm (oil change)

8mm allen wrench (transmission plug)
Oil filter tool 65mm/67mm

22mm open end wrench (lambda sensors)
13mm box wrench (caliper housing)
17mm open end (brake caliper bolt holding)
External Torx sockets, sizes ...
E12 - muffler flange bolts
 

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beer...beer huggie...bottle opener...
but seriously...thought about this same issue this afternoon while I was putting a protective carpet in the breadcrumb...you read my mind Dantin...
the metric crap plus a set of basic hand tools,cutters, pliers, drivers,fuses, wire&wire terminals. I even told the bride to put a fire extinguisher like all of the other cars....
What for?...to put out the guy that doesn't have one when needed....
...plus many more ....

jetfuel
 

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here's a list of some of their description. I give it to the rookies at work....

jetfuel

DRILL PRESS: A tall upright machine useful for suddenly snatching
flat metal bar stock out of your hands so that it smacks you in the
chest and flings your beer across the room, denting the
freshly-painted project which you had carefully set in the corner
where nothing could get to it.

WIRE WHEEL: Cleans paint off bolts and then throws them somewhere
under the workbench with the speed of light. Also removes fingerprints
and hard-earned calluses from fingers in about the time it takes you
to say, 'Oh sh -- '

ELECTRIC HAND DRILL: Normally used for spinning pop rivets in their
holes until you die of old age.

SKILL SAW: A portable cutting tool used to make studs too short.

PLIERS: Used to round off bolt heads. Sometimes used in the creation
of blood-blisters.

BELT SANDER: An electric sanding tool commonly used to convert minor


touch-up jobs into major refinishing jobs.

HACKSAW: One of a family of cutting tools built on the Ouija board
principle. It transforms human energy into a crooked, unpredictable
motion, and the more you attempt to influence its course, the more
dismal your future becomes.

VISE-GRIPS: Generally used after pliers to completely round off bolt
heads. If nothing else is available, they can also be used to transfer
intense welding heat to the palm of your hand.

OXYACETYLENE TORCH: Used almost entirely for lighting various
flammable objects in your shop on fire. Also handy for igniting the
grease inside the wheel hub out of which you want to remove a bearing
race.

TABLE SAW: A large stationary power tool commonly used to launch wood
projectiles for testing wall integrity.

HYDRAULIC FLOOR JACK: Used for lowering an automobile to the ground
after you have installed your new brake shoes, trapping the jack
handle firmly under the bumper.

BAND SAW: A large stationary power saw primarily used by most shops
to cut good aluminum sheet into smaller pieces that more easily fit
into the trash can after you cut on the inside of the line instead of
the outside edge.

TWO-TON ENGINE HOIST: A tool for testing the maximum tensile strength
of everything you forgot to disconnect.

PHILLIPS SCREWDRIVER: Normally used to stab the vacuum seals under
lids or for opening old-style paper-and-tin oil cans and splashing oil
on your shirt; but can also be used, as the name implies, to strip out
Phillips screw heads.

STRAIGHT SCREWDRIVER: A tool for opening paint cans. Sometimes used
to convert common slotted screws into non-removable screws and
butchering your palms.

PRY BAR: A tool used to crumple the metal surrounding that clip or
bracket you needed to remove in order to replace a 50 cent part.

HOSE CUTTER: A tool used to make hoses too short.

HAMMER: Originally employed as a weapon of war, the hammer nowadays
is used as a kind of divining rod to locate the most expensive parts
adjacent the object we are trying to hit.

UTILITY KNIFE: Used to open and slice through the contents of
cardboard cartons delivered to your front door; works particularly
well on contents such as seats, vinyl records, liquids in plastic
bottles, collector magazines, refund checks, and rubber or plastic
parts. Especially useful for slicing work clothes, but only while in
use.

DAMM-IT TOOL: Any handy tool that you grab and throw across the garage
while yelling 'DAMM-IT' at the top of your lungs. It is also, most
often, the next tool that you will need.

 

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Discussion Starter #6
So far, we have the tools for all exterior work including removing the tailgate. The T45 is for the cargo hold-down ring.

We need the external Torx sizes!
 

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The one most important tool set I carry in the car and use the most is this 26pc cheapo driver set. My all time favorite for the car and I highly recommend it. (OK, not one as in only as I carry a lot of tools)
 

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here's a list of some of their description. I give it to the rookies at work....
jetfuel
Jetfuel,
Excellent list! A MUST HAVE. You forgot one or two tools, however. The first that comes to mind (thinking back to my MG days), are the wire snips, which are the perfect tool for releasing electrical smoke, thus causing total failure on the circuit.

For those unfamiliar with the Theory of Electrical Smoke (as put forth by Joe Lucas, AKA The Prince of Darkness):

ELECTRICAL THEORY OF SMOKE...BY JOSEPH LUCAS

Positive ground depends upon proper circuit functioning, the transmission of negative ions by retention of the visible spectral manifestation known as "smoke". Smoke is the thing that makes electrical circuits work; we know this to be true because every time one lets the smoke out of the electrical system, it stops working. This can be verified repeatedly through empirical testing.

When, for example, the smoke escapes from an electrical component (i.e., say, a Lucas voltage regulator), it will be observed that the component stops working. The function of the wire harness is to carry the smoke from one device to another; when the wire harness "springs a leak", and lets all the smoke out of the system, nothing works afterwards. Starter motors were frowned upon in British Automobiles for some time, largely because they consume large quantities of smoke, requiring very large wires.

It has been noted that Lucas components are possibly more prone to electrical leakage than Bosch or generic Japanese electrics. Experts point out that this is because Lucas is British and all things British leak. British engines leak oil, shock absorbers, hydraulic forks and disk brakes leak fluid, British tires leak air and the British defense establishment leaks secrets...so, naturally, British electronics leak smoke.

Author Unknown
 

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... a big thank you for the new ammunition to take to work...
...by now the avionics guys at the shop know what I hate more than 1 sparky.....2...


jetfuel
 

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... a big thank you for the new ammunition to take to work...
...by now the avionics guys at the shop know what I hate more than 1 sparky.....2...
As a retired avionics ("two wire") guy, I can appreciate that... Just make sure they never "seal" a wave guide with a zip-lock baggy while the radar is in repair...(Yeah, that happened)
 

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My smart Tool Outfit

The below will do anything on the smart that I intend to do. All bought separately, not in sets.

In smart tailgate:
Tool box - 6” x 4” x 1”
Tire plugging kit
Single-edge razor (to cut off plug ends)
Long nose pliers w/ side cutter
Screwdriver w/ straight and Phillips blades
Small Crescent wrench
Small dial-type tire pressure gauge

In small drawer of shop's rolling toolbox (smart specific):
Long Torx “L” keys – T15, T20, T25, T27, T40
Torx bit sockets – T15, T20, T25, T27, T30, T40, T47, T50
Oil plug socket – 24mm, 3/8” drive
Transmission plug allen socket – 8mm, 3/8” drive
Oil filter tool, 65mm/67mm – 3/8” drive
Lug bolt socket – 15mm deep, 3/8” drive

Other shop tools (non-smart specific but useful):
Torque wrench – 3/8” drive
Socket sets w/ u-joints, extensions, etc. - 3/8" & 1/4" drives
Multi-meter
Fuse puller
Air gauge – 0-60 psi
Portable air tank
Regulated battery charger
Battery load tester
Jack
Oil collection pan
Rear wheel ramps - 2' x 2"x8" end-beveled boards (actually 1-1/2" x 7-1/2", but the extra 1-1/2" still makes a big difference in the ease of changing the oil)
 

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Cheap tools are too expensive. The cheap ones usually break, causing you to buy a new one, and often, while breaking, they damage the part you are working on so you have to buy a new one of those too!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Old Smart -- thanks for posting your tool list. I especially like your tailgate kit. I understand most of its contents, but would appreciate your thoughts on the adjustable crescent wrench.

Would you add comments regarding where some of the less-common socket sizes are used?

My in-car kit also includes some smaller torx bits that fit my screwdriver, fuses and a fuse puller.
 

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Old Smart -- thanks for posting your tool list. I especially like your tailgate kit. I understand most of its contents, but would appreciate your thoughts on the adjustable crescent wrench.

Would you add comments regarding where some of the less-common socket sizes are used?

My in-car kit also includes some smaller torx bits that fit my screwdriver, fuses and a fuse puller.
The Crescent wrench ("shifting spanner")? - y' never know. A spare I had laying around. I might be better off replacing that with a small visegrip.

Torx sockets: The torx sizes were determined from studying all of the Evilution and FQ101 "how-to"s for things I may attempt myself. Kane recommended that I back up the torx sockets with long-reach torx "L" keys in the sizes noted.

Because it is a pain to dig the air compressor out of the passenger footwell, I may move that back to the tailgate too.
 

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As a retired avionics ("two wire") guy, I can appreciate that... Just make sure they never "seal" a wave guide with a zip-lock baggy while the radar is in repair...(Yeah, that happened)
AH... "He was a Microwave man with a Micro-mind." (long ago and far away): :D A2Jack.
 
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