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Torque Specifications:

Lug/Wheel nuts - (24mm hex)
81 ft/lbs
Oil Filter - 14Nm (10.3 ft/lbs)
Oil Sump nut (Drain Plug) - 65Nm (48 ft-lb)

Don't have anything for TPMS but I believe it was in one of the wheel swap threads somewhere.
 

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I found this on the Hanco site...


  • On vehicles with tire pressure sensors within the wheel, sensor nut and valve cores must be torqued to specified inch pounds.
Cores must be at 0.13 - 0.27 ft. lbs. (0.17-0.37 N.m).

Found other sites that specified 1/4" Inch Pound for the correct torque
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for the help. I read thru posts and cube states 8nm .tire rack told me 4nm which translates to 35.4 inch pounds.I did not mount the tires yet.but good news I found a cheap source of tpm sensors. It was confirmed by Tire Rack but since I have yet to mount them can't personally confirm it.:)
oh the source is cheaper than tirerack.
 

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Dunerunner, the units of torque are ft lb, nm , ..., not ft/lb or n/m. Torque is the product of force and distance with the force applied perpendicular to the direction that the distance is measured. That's important when you are pulling on a wrench or breaker bar, that is a foot long, with a force of ten pounds in order to produce 10 ft lb torque. If you are not pulling perpendicular to the bar you will generate less than 10 ft lb. I'm not trying to be a wise guy but I think we should use the correct units and be consistent. It is very common, and very wrong, to say, for example, "30 pounds tire pressure" (should be 30 pounds per square inch, ie. lb/in^^2, or PSI), or "1500 BTU heater" when it really is BTU per minute (BTU/min). Off course the worst (and most dangerous) thing is to mix up metric and English units. Nasa did this on a Mars mission several years ago and destroyed an expensive spacecraft when they mixed up the units for a thruster firing to slow it down. Turns out one group of engineers was using pounds and another was using Newtons.
 
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