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Problem solved. My electrician was smart. He said that even though you're showing a ground, that doesn't mean it's the same ground. I learned that the chassis ground and neutral get tied together at your main panel. Mine was not but getting ground from the pipe in the ground over that 150ft run. The charger must be testing for continuity between neutral and chassis ground. We used a spare wire to ground all the way back to the panel chassis and it worked. He'll put in a dedicated outlet for me (so I'll have 20a) later this week. I can't install a 240v but I'll be ok. I'd like to get a spare 110v Level 1 charger so I can leave one set up in the garage and the original one be my portable. They aren't as prevalent as the 240v Level 2 ones and not cheap either.
 

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I'd like to get a spare 110v Level 1 charger so I can leave one set up in the garage and the original one be my portable. They aren't as prevalent as the 240v Level 2 ones and not cheap either.
Glad it was just the ground. I looked at buying another L1 charger for the same reasons you give. I thought the AeroVironment TurboCord and the Clipper Creek ACS-15 looked promising. The TurboCord is actually a dual L1 or L2 charger depending on the input voltage.

As you wrote, they're not cheap. I ended up buying a L2 charger instead. It was actually less expensive than another L1 charger.

Now we just need to get back to the OP topic. How's the generator going?
 

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What about this used one on ebay? It's only $275. Is there any reason it wouldn't work? I see the ACS-15 can get you 25amp 120v. If I'm going to buy another 120v charger, it might as well be the best it could be. I do have a 20amp outlet.

Nissan Leaf Electric Car Charger Evse Level 1 J1772 | eBay

Have you guys seen the open source ones? None are 120v but I bet I can modify it. I should start a new topic.

Combos ? OpenEV Store
 

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I just heard back from the OpenEVSE guy that all their charging stations, except for the new 50A one, take 110V as well as 208V-240V. They simply operate as a L1 charger. This is great because they are cheaper than anything else out there and they are open source so I can mess around with it and get updates (adding wifi, btooth, etc.). When I finally re-run my power for 240V, I won't have to buy another station. Basic station is $185 but you need a cable too so it comes out to about $300.
 

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Has anyone tried a power conditioner yet? I ran into the same issue trying to charge using a Yamaha portable generator. I've also had the same problem charging in my barn/garage, probably due to low voltage, in that case.


I would love to be able to charge in an emergency, at our wilderness property, where we have no power
 

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Hi I just came across this topic. I once brought an honda eu2000 to a dealer to see if it would charge a smart car for emergencies since the range was a bit low. It did not. The salesperson said he would get back to me after talking to the service dept. He did not. Well I recently learned that small putt putt generators don't have a bonded ground and neutral. So based on post 21 I think that may be why a small generator does not charge. You can test this by using a continuity meter on the ground and neutral pins on a generator outlet. If there is no continuity, then you can fix it by buying a male edison 15amp plug and put a small jumper between the N the G, and plug it into an outlet on the genny. Be sure you know the difference in the G,H and N pins. Once corrected it should charge the vehicle. I don't have access to an electric smart car to test this but I hope someone can try. Thanks
 

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Hi I just came across this topic. I once brought an honda eu2000 to a dealer to see if it would charge a smart car for emergencies since the range was a bit low. It did not. The salesperson said he would get back to me after talking to the service dept. He did not. Well I recently learned that small putt putt generators don't have a bonded ground and neutral. So based on post 21 I think that may be why a small generator does not charge. You can test this by using a continuity meter on the ground and neutral pins on a generator outlet. If there is no continuity, then you can fix it by buying a male edison 15amp plug and put a small jumper between the N the G, and plug it into an outlet on the genny. Be sure you know the difference in the G,H and N pins. Once corrected it should charge the vehicle. I don't have access to an electric smart car to test this but I hope someone can try. Thanks
Yes. This is not just a particular thing of the Smart charging adapter. It is part of the SAE J1772 charging protocol for all US EVs and charging stations. The smaller pilot-signal pin (pin 4) on the EVSE plug sends a 12 volt square wave** to the car. The car signals "I'm ready for charging" by grounding out the pilot signal through a diode and 882 ohm resistor This pulls down the signal voltage and signals the EVSE to turn power on to the charging plug. However, the chassis ground the diode/resistor is connected to is connected to the safety ground, not the neutral prong of a 120 volt plug. But a 120 volt EVSE apparently uses neutral for its ground. So the circuit can only be completed if the safety ground and neutral are connected. This is always the case for household wiring.
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** The purpose of the square wave is to tell the car how much current the car is allowed to draw from the EVSE - the on-off duty cycle of the square wave corresponds to a specified amperage.
 

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Guess that’s what you do when you bought the wrong Electric MAJOR Appliance?

Read the specs, 68 miles on a good day.

So if you need to go more than 34 miles OW with no charger at the destination, better rethink your options??? 🛵
 

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What doesn’t make sense. Using a gasoline generator, to charge up a EV.
I think any question that involves using a small generator to charge an EV is just to have back up plan if something awful happened and not an everyday occurrence. The Volt and I3 with range extender are basically an EV with a small ICE engine that generates electricity built into the vehicle. I do love Smart Cars but the range on the electric version was always too short for me even under the best of circumstances. Can't imagine what's its like during the winter.
 

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I think any question that involves using a small generator to charge an EV is just to have back up plan if something awful happened and not an everyday occurrence. The Volt and I3 with range extender are basically an EV with a small ICE engine that generates electricity built into the vehicle. I do love Smart Cars but the range on the electric version was always too short for me even under the best of circumstances. Can't imagine what's its like during the winter.
If my Chevy Volt would have been a small SUV I'd still have it. I loved the concept of that the car.
 

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Guess that’s what you do when you bought the wrong Electric MAJOR Appliance?

Read the specs, 68 miles on a good day.

So if you need to go more than 34 miles OW with no charger at the destination, better rethink your options??? 🛵
In summer and avoiding using the AC, I have generally been on track to get 90 miles out of my ED (not exceeding 60 mph), but you certainly can't do that when it gets colder.
 

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If my Chevy Volt would have been a small SUV I'd still have it. I loved the concept of that the car.
I agree that the volt had a great concept. If it looked bit sharper they would have sold more. Too many cars and SUV's have the best aesthetics of an egg.
 

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In summer and avoiding using the AC, I have generally been on track to get 90 miles out of my ED (not exceeding 60 mph), but you certainly can't do that when it gets colder.
What part fo the country are you in? What kind of range do you manage during the winter? I'm in the northeast with a 20-30 mile commute on average.
 

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What part fo the country are you in? What kind of range do you manage during the winter? I'm in the northeast with a 20-30 mile commute on average.
Western Pennsylvania. In winter - even if you can manage not running the heat, range goes down to the mid 50's miles in temeratures around 25-30F. The worst range was a morning when it was about -5 to -10F with snow and some wheel spinning on hills, when the projected range was probably in the upper 30's miles at best.

Also note that I do practically no 70 mph expressway driving. These ranges are urban-suburban driving at less than 50 mph.

I don't use the car's range estimator - it almost always underestimates the remaining range until you are down to 20 percent SOC. This is especially true with my larger tires. Use the odometer and the SOC gauge. Unless there is a changing terrain or driving style over the trip, the miles to get to 80 percent SOC can simply be multiplied by 5 to get a pretty good total range estimate.

The Smart will do a 30 mile round trip commute no problem.

Note that the reason that the range goes down in cold weather is only partly heater usage, the biggest contributor is that battery's internal resistance goes up in cold weather and thus the minimum allowable voltage under a load occurs much sooner as the battery is discharged - so the usable capacity shrinks. In the Smart, the range reduction is especially dramatic becasue the battery capacity is small relative to the current load that must be drawn from it when driving. A smart ED with its little 17.5 kWh battery must routinely draw 4-5C from the battery pack (i.e. amperage equal to 4-5 times the the capacity of the pack in amp-hours) But a Chevy Bolt will only draw only about 2C from it much bigger 65 KWh (?) battery, so the cold weather degradation is less. Long range Teslas are presumably even better, if you can afford one.
 

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If your garage 120v wiring & outlets are all good you can then use a 100 foot extension cord to charge your EVs. BUT it must have 10 gauge conductors.!! This will charge the SmartED in both FAST and SLOW modes available on the cable that came with my 2016 ED3, the one with the yellow curled cord.

I hope/pray the poster plans to carry his Honda 'pure sine wave' e2000 inverter generator on a trailer hitch platform safely outside the passenger compartment.

Keep in mind that the Smart body shape is ideal for serious SemiSlipStreaming - to reduce your watts per mile.
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What would be nice to have would be a portable 240v battery powered generator with a high amp hour rating that would handle 32amps to a 240v J1772 plug cable. It could sit in the back on those days when needed. Kinda like a power bank backup for your phone, except you couldn't drive while charging. But no fumes! :D
 

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What would be nice to have would be a portable 240v battery powered generator with a high amp hour rating that would handle 32amps to a 240v J1772 plug cable. It could sit in the back on those days when needed. Kinda like a power bank backup for your phone, except you couldn't drive while charging. But no fumes! :D
The Smart's 3.5 kw N. American charger can only draw a maximum of 15 amps, so such a thing might be a bit easier to get or build yourself with off-the shelf large format cells like these an an appropriate AC inverter:


Note, from what I can tell you need 12 of these modules plus a charger - total price $23,449. Electric Motorsport.com started as a supplier for DIY electric car and motorcycle conversions but had to move to the deeper pocket yacht power supply sector to stay in business.
 

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@Yinzer, "The Smart's 3.5 kw N. American charger can only draw a maximum of 15 amps". Umm, my 2017 453, which is a typical USA ED/EQ, has the 7.2kWatt onboard charger. It draws 29.xx amps every time I plug in the 240 line cable. I can read this right off the cable as it's charging. Which is why I said 32 amps above.
 
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