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This has been one of the big questions lots of people have had: What happens in a Gen3 when you run out of juice. Well, it happened to me twice over the past weekend, so I can tell you with authority exactly what happens. :D

Most probably know that at 20% it gives you a big ugly warning screen. At 10% it does the same thing, and replaces the "estimated remaining" value with the words "Low Battery". Hitting 0%, you may or may not still have more juice depending on the number of bars you have. If you have 3 bars, you have a little more time, if not, find a place to pull over.

If you run it long enough, it gives up, puts out a rather shrill 3-second beep, and drops into [0] gear. This is effectively neutral, allowing you to coast without regen friction.

Once it's stopped, you can turn it off and back on again. After several beeps and screen warnings, you can drive it about 1500 feet. If you run it out again, it does the [0] mode again, and then you're done.

In my first run in with this on Friday night the car dropped as I was driving up my street. I coasted to the drive way and used the remaining charge to get into the garage.

The second time, on Sunday, I was just coming off the highway, about a mile from home. The second boost was enough to get me into the parking lot of a neighborhood diner that I knew had an outside plug. On chatting with the manager she let me plug in and hang out for about an hour and a half. We wound up having dinner there, and will probably go a bit more often since they were very nice about the whole event.

One more thing: Once it's double-dead it will not start up until you hit 10%. Frustrating when you're done dining, and know 7% is more than enough to travel the 1 mile home, but the car simply refuses to move.
 

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No kidding, did you run it that low on purpose or do you have a commute that is at the max edge of what the car is capable of?

I hit 4% one time and it spooked me, since then the lowest I have gone (in 4000 miles of driving it) is 15%.
 

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I don't let it go less than 40%. Plenty to still go anywhere that I can get recharged. Well even 20% left still will be good to get me to a place to be charged.
 

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That's why you carry an extension cord.

When you run out of juice, you knock on someone's door and make a new friend by asking to plug in for 1/2 an hour?
(I always offer them a few $, but they never take it.)
 

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It's also good to note that running the battery down to zero is pretty bad for its longevity. That's a pretty deep discharge! :eek:
 

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I've run mine down to 0% once but the car didn't die out. I was only about 100 feet from the driveway so no biggie.

Many other occasions I've had mine below 10% but knowing I'm on city streets and really close to home.
 

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Somebody else told me their car died at 5% though and they needed towing to a charging station. I'm skeptical about this and believe it was more likely they last looked at their gauge at 5%...
 

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Great work! You sacrificed some nerves for science!

I tried to find out by running the heater until the Soc read zero. the kW was down to one bar, but the car would still drive. Now I live on a hill and didn't dare drive down to get stuck there...

Interesting side note: As the Soc approaced zero, the car turned down heater power (fan and temp on max) until it was only blowing cold air. But it still moved when I punched the go pedal!
 

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Except our cars don't have an exhaust pipe to blow fake smoke through.

Maybe the engineers should have thought of that!
:confused: I attempt to give some credit to a car I wouldn't own, and get slapped?

You do realize your car runs of essentially the same battery technology as an electronic cigarette, or a notebook computer, right? They employ battery management which prevents deep discharge and overcharging.
 

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I don't think he knows you use eCigs... :confused:

Anyway, I think what NCC is trying to say is that he hopes the ED manages its battery like an eCig or a smartphone. Instead of literally going 100% dead, 0% just means that you have no more usable power until the next charge. :)
 

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Somebody else told me their car died at 5% though and they needed towing to a charging station. I'm skeptical about this and believe it was more likely they last looked at their gauge at 5%...
Sounds like business as normal to me. You can witness this in electronic devices that use the same type of batteries. Remaining battery shows as 5% yet the device dies. Usually it's just a matter of the gauge just getting it wrong. :(

In temps of around 20 F, my iPhone 5 battery will drop from 70% to 20% in the blink of an eye and it'll shutdown before even hitting 0%. Then, as soon as I return the phone to warmer conditions it'll boot back up and show just under the battery level I originally had.

If it persists, then calibration is needed. :)
 
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