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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My smart is a daily driver, but a few days ago I switched cars with my mom. She called me this morning telling me she couldn't get the car to start. So when I got out of school today I went to her house to see if I could figure out what was the cause. I pulled up the carpet to look at the battery and found the well it sits in full of water. Any ideas? I'm hoping I can just drain it and let everything dry out but afraid it might be a serious repair. Any and all help is appreciated. By the way, my smart is a 2009 passion.
 

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There a large rubber plug in the floor near the battery - might want to check it's not leaking. Also it's possible the A/C drain hose may be the culprit. :)
 

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There a large rubber plug in the floor near the battery - might want to check it's not leaking. Also it's possible the A/C drain hose may be the culprit. :)
I see this issue in the forums and wonder; just install a drain hole in the bottom of the battery holder, down through the underside cover so any water issues would drain out? Possible?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That's a clever idea but I live in south Florida and I'm not sure how well that alarm would hold up to the summer conditions here since the interior of our cars easily reach the 140-160 F on an almost daily basis for about 5 months. Also, it still doesn't keep the water from accumulating in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
At first glance the ac drain line looks ok but I might not be looking in the right area. I'll see if there are any videos that show where and what I should be looking for...unfortunately for me I'm not the most mechanically inclined girl in the world, at least not when it comes to cars, so hopefully it will be a fairly easy and inexpensive fix.
 

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Hey, IttyBitty
The condensate drain tube runs along the top and left side of the battery and goes thru the sidewall at the left rear of the battery. It is black and is a two part invention [ :D ] There is a rubber drain plug in place UNDER the battery but it is not a drain unless you remove it. Mine has flooded my battery compartment a couple of times on long trips in the summer. I'm not sure why, as it does not seem to be plugged. I did flush it. A turkey baster may be helpful. There is a large fuse holder down in the battery well that feeds the starter, and may need to be cleaned, or checked to see if it is blown. Come to think of it, there is a second fuse holder in there as well. Be sure to disconnect the battery before opening the fuse holder. It is a 5 amp fuse. CRC 2-26 improves electrical properties and drives out moisture without harming plastics. Available at The Home Depot, and maybe at auto parts stores. I don't know about Lowe's but probably there too.
I had been working on my smart once when a storm blew in. I did not get the tailgate properly latched, with the ensuing monsoon that followed, water ran under the carpet all the way to the battery compartment and filled it. I had to take the carpet out to get it to dry as the foam rubber sponge backing is highly absorbent and would have mildewed readily. I had to disconnect the battery while the seats were out until I could get the carpet out. Don't disconnect the connectors under the seats for several minutes after the battery is out, for sure, if you need to take the seats out to get the carpet out. I made a single small cut in the carpet behind the shifter console so I did not have to take the shift knob off and the console. You have to rotate the collar under the shift knob, which I could not accomplish at the time, to get the knob off, and then the console will com out with a fair bit of consternation. :D I hope this rambling helps. I really suspect the a.c. drain needs to be flushed out, and or re-assembled. Sorry for the rambling. Best wishes, and good luck.
 

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That's a clever idea but I live in south Florida and I'm not sure how well that alarm would hold up to the summer conditions here since the interior of our cars easily reach the 140-160 F on an almost daily basis for about 5 months. Also, it still doesn't keep the water from accumulating in the first place.
You can make your own water alarm with a cheap d.c. 5 to 12 volt buzzer or enunciator, a nine volt battery, an aspirin some wire and a clothes pin. Rig the alarm in series with the battery, and use the clothes pin to mash the positive an negative wires against the aspirin. When water dissolves the aspirin, the positive and negative wires touch and the buzzer sounds. Reset the alarm by replacing the aspirin after drying off the alarm and water source. Wires should be long enough that only the clothes pin becomes submerged. You could add a snap on 9 volt battery wire set to make things a bit easier. A pushbutton switch across the wires going to each side of the aspirin, would add a circuit test. It doesn't have to be expensive to be functional.
 

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That's a clever idea but I live in south Florida and I'm not sure how well that alarm would hold up to the summer conditions here since the interior of our cars easily reach the 140-160 F on an almost daily basis for about 5 months. Also, it still doesn't keep the water from accumulating in the first place.
The water alarm I am looking at has these operating parameters:
Operating Temperature: 32°F to 122°F (0°C to 50°C)
Storage Temperature: -14°F to 185°F (-10°C to 85°C)

Sonin Water Alarm with Remote Sensor 00800 - Sonin Online Store

And would be used as a warning indicator before the water has a chance to accumulate.

For $20 worth a look.
 

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door seals, AC vents, around the mirrors, and windshield, and top door corners are known to leak. common on a lot of Smarts..

simple test, dry it out, run it through a car wash, heavy rain or hose it down... then check again.. then track it down..

if you have a convertible as I do, tailgate, and rear corners..and dont forget those top rails! poor sealing will soak the front and rear floors and

youll never know it.

hope this helps...

steveg... 450 s.mann cabrio
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I'll look into that, although I was thinking more about the frequency of replacing the 9V than how the unit itself would hold up. Last time I bought a decent 9V it was over $5 for 1. Since the AC gets used here at least 9-10 months of the year the alarm could get to be rather pricey. But I suppose it's still cheaper than replacing any electronics.
 

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I'll look into that, although I was thinking more about the frequency of replacing the 9V than how the unit itself would hold up. Last time I bought a decent 9V it was over $5 for 1. Since the AC gets used here at least 9-10 months of the year the alarm could get to be rather pricey. But I suppose it's still cheaper than replacing any electronics.
A 12-volt to 9-volt step down converter could be used wired into the cars switched socket on the fuse box (be sure to add an appropriate inline fuse), then connected to a water alert device. Would be active when the car is running. However the battery in these devices may last a long time in detection mode.

Such as this one: http://www.amazon.com/KEEDOX%C2%AE-Converter-Supply-Module-Non-isolated/dp/B00A71E52G or power converter, such as: http://www.amazon.com/Phimore-Regulated-Mobile-Converter-3-6-9-12/dp/B00G75GKYC/ref=sr_1_2?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1435189972&sr=1-2&keywords=12+volt+to+9+volt+converter
 

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My smart is a daily driver, but a few days ago I switched cars with my mom. She called me this morning telling me she couldn't get the car to start. So when I got out of school today I went to her house to see if I could figure out what was the cause. I pulled up the carpet to look at the battery and found the well it sits in full of water. Any ideas? I'm hoping I can just drain it and let everything dry out but afraid it might be a serious repair. Any and all help is appreciated. By the way, my smart is a 2009 passion.
Hey the same thing happened to me a while ago I mean and it was full of water but what I did number one,is I cleared that little drain hole in the battery well it was clogged so the water came out of the well number two I got a blow dryer hooked up from a big extension cord and tried to dry everything off number three,checked fuses and one was blown I changed the fuse and it started right up,Good Luck!
 
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