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Ok, I managed to find vids and take a look at both the front compartment and the rear compartment. I don't see the wiring setup thats posted in those pics concerning the fraying issue.
Is it because that was only an issue in the ICE version of the Smart?
 

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Ok, I managed to find vids and take a look at both the front compartment and the rear compartment. I don't see the wiring setup thats posted in those pics concerning the fraying issue.
Is it because that was only an issue in the ICE version of the Smart?
The wire harness wearing is occurring somewhere along the wiring harness between modules and controls in dashboard area and the motor compartment. A lot of the wiring is not-so-tidily packed into area behind the plastic interior panel behind the passenger seat where the drivetrain control unit and related connectors is located (see pages 62 and 63 of the general service info primer posted in a sticky above). So, I have a strong suspicion that this is the area where all the wiring wear problems are happening.


If you could remove this panel (the whole panel, not just the taillight bulb access door) and take some pictures of the wiring, it would be a greatly appreciated by everyone here!
 

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OK. Cause of wiring chafing found and fixed!

I removed the interior panel. It snaps right off and if I knew it came off this easily I would have done it sooner. The wear point on my Smart and probably other 451 ED's is a rather sharp turned-up edge of steel around a "window" in the steel bodywork used to access the taillights (photo). The repair that was done at the MB dealer last year is the black tape "blob" in the bundle. The repair tech's method of preventing a recurrence seems to have been to remove some slack wire from this congested area by pushing the wire bundle through the rubber gland (bottom of photos) so the repair is now below this sharp edge.

My repair for making sure it does not happen again was to pad the sharp edge with adhesive foam rubber overlain with duct tape, and also wrap the wire bundles with electrical tape near the rub point. I also zip-tied some wire bundles together. See the second photo.

You can also probably do this repair through the taillight access door, but taking the whole panel off is easy enough and allows a thorough inspection and room to do the repair. Just make sure to engage the button-and-slot attachment in the lower rear corner of the panel when replacing.

I strongly recommend that every 2013-15 Smart ED owner go out and check this area on their Smart ASAP!
 

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Nice snark. Did my point about quality-control reputations of various countries really go over your head? Making a wiring harness that does not destroy itself from vibrations is not exactly rocket science...
I have heard many benz same issue

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

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Okay, thanks to the posts in this thread and Yinzer's photos, my son and I attacked this issue and did a preemptive strike before a problem occurred. We used quarter inch split loom tubing as you can see in the photos. On the coupe we did remove the entire panel. As a point of info, there is one Torx screw to remove. The rest of the panel just pops in/out via plastic clips.

On the coupe we used a little tubing on the actual wires, but then found out how easy and effective just putting it around the metal opening would be and that's all we did on the cabriolet.

On the cabriolet we just accessed the problem area via the small panel. Since we saw how nicely the tubing worked, we saw no need to remove the whole panel. Cost for the job - around a buck.

Len
2014 EV Coupe 18,000 miles
2014 EV Cabriolet 13,500 miles
 

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I'm bumping an old thread. While perusing my ALLDATAdiy Smart manual, I found the service bulletin for the chafing problem, It appears that a known problem causing chafing point is at a different location than what I thought. The bulletin includes a long list of fault codes associated with this chafing problem - but the important part is the first page and the photos from the bulletin which are included below:
Text Font Line Parallel Document Tire Automotive tire Auto part Automobile repair shop Automotive wheel system Tire Auto part Automotive tire Pipe Bumper Auto part Vehicle Car Hood Rust Auto part

Inspecting this area requires getting the car up on stands and getting underneath it.
 

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Thanks for posting this. From the sounds of your post, you haven't checked yours yet have you? I'm due for service on mine this spring. Have to get under there and take a look. I don't recall anyone on the forum mentioning having had a problem there, have you? Did the bulletin give a fix or something to do to keep there from being a problem?

Len
2014 EV Coupe 19,500 miles
2014 EV Cabriolet 16,500 miles
 

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The only fix specified in the bulletin was just to repair any broken wires using any of the MB-approved methods. I would hope the service tech would also care enough to add padding or relocate the rubbing part of the wire harness to prevent a recurrence - but I guess we can't assume that, eh?

I now know why they also replaced the whole charging receptacle and wiring when they repaired the harness chafing on my car. That orange-sheathed cable in the pictures is the AC power cable to the on-board charger.

I'll inspect mine soon when I get a chance.
 

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My car now many miles later gives me a no start no charge HV service errors.
I moved the wires a little, tryed again and starts charges fine now.

Drove it to work again, I will be looking around for chaffing again, my rear hatch is super dirty from city driving etc so I am not sure how to safely clean it up to allow me to look over the wires.
I do not want to add water to my electical sysstem issues.
 
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