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The best commercially available fuel system cleaners use a substance called PEA (polyether amine), with concentrations of up to about 40% according to their MSDS. PEA is the primary ingredient in Techron and other cleaners such as from Gumout. It doesn't look like either of these products contain that. The second says it contains a light oil with a solvent, so it's probably similar to Marvel Mystery Oil or Seafoam. While it can work to help clean fuel system deposits, it doesn't work as well as PEA, and can create some problems as well.
 

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I was googling some links for you and stumbled across this one:

https://shedheads.net/best-fuel-injector-cleaner

which says that Lucas fuel system cleaner has PEA, so that would be the one I would use of the two that you have.

As far as a solvent in a light oil carrier, gasoline engines aren't designed to burn oil. In the good old days, with much looser engine tolerances and poorer metallurgy and lubricants, putting some sort of oil into the fuel may have helped. In modern engines, I don't think it's a good idea.

This is my experience and I've heard of others who have experienced the same thing. Several years ago, I purchased a used Miata with an unknown service history, and I was using MMO in the crankcase as a light solvent to clean things up. In that use, it did work to gently remove a lot of the softer buildup in the oil passages. Somewhere along the way, someone suggested I use it in the BMW that my son drove. At that time, he was primarily driving it just a few miles each day, to and from the park-n-ride so that it never got fully up to operating temp. It started running kind of rough as a result and so I tried about 8 ounces of MMO in the gas tank. Almost immediately, it generated a P0140 error code indicating some issue with the O2 sensors. I asked around and found others who had also experienced the same thing. I cleared the code and after running that tank down nearly to empty and refilling, it went away and hasn't come back.

Might have been innocuous, but with the O2 sensors not functioning properly, it could have generated a lean condition that might have gotten bad if the car were being driven hard.
 
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